SIERRA LEONE GOVERNMENT OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF STAFF STATE HOUSE PRESS RELEASE

Government wishes to inform the general public that it is fully committed to implementing the Extractive Industries Trasnparency Initiative (EITI) for the promotion of transparency and accountability in the extractive sectors.

In this regard, Government has established the EITI Secretariat at 29 Dundas Street, Freetown, away from State House so as to enhance access of the public.

The Multi-stakeholder Group (MSG), which is the governing body of the EITI, has been expanded to include the following:

i) Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources
ii) Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security
iii) Petroleum Directorate
iv) Council of Paramount Chiefs
v) Association of Local Councils of Sierra Leone
vi) Association of Dealers and Exporters
vii) Two more representative from Civil Society

The scope of the EITI report which initially focused on the mining sector, now incorporates the oil/gas sector for the 2008, 2009 and 2010 reconciliation report. Also, districts, local councils and chiefdoms where direct payments are made by large scale companies are now to disclose receipts of payments to the Reconciler.

The recruitment of a Reconciler who will be responsible for the production of the second reconciliation report is in progress.

The Government is also addressing recommendations in the first report. The Mining Cadastre Office (MCO) in the Ministry of Mineral Resources which among other functions generates revenue data on companies for the EITI process, is now functional and has been rolled out to offices in Bo, Kenema, Makeni and Kono. In addition, a Minerals Working Group and the Extractive Revenue Taskforce have been established to facilitate information sharing and assist with the EITI process.

And in order to promote access to revenue information, an On-line Repository has been developed which will soon be made available to the public.

The Government is aware that enactment of a law is critical to the implementation of the EITI. As a result, a committee drawn from diverse backgrounds has been set up to facilitate the passing of the EITI bill into law in early 2012.

The Government wishes to make 2012 a year of difference for the EITI, and as such, it will assiduously work with all stakeholders concerned.

Public Service Commission presents 2016 annual report to President Koroma

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone, Wednesday October 4th, 2017//– The Public Service Commission (PSC) this afternoon submitted its 2016 annual report to President Dr Ernest Bai Koroma at State House in Freetown.

On the occasion, the president pledged to address the concerns of the PSC, assuring them of government’s continued support. He commended the PSC for the presentation on the ongoing transformational strides taking place within the general civil service structure, and urged them to continue the measures being put in place. “We must try to professionalize the civil service as much as we could,” he said, adding that the ongoing transformation of the service is being done against the background that Sierra Leone needs a very efficient civil service because government can only perform to the extent of the capabilities of the civil service. “That is why our focus on energizing the public service is not displaced and we believe the measures you have put in place are on track,” he pointed out.

President Koroma also stated that although a lot of professionals are still attracted to the private sector due to improved conditions of service, he encouraged the PSC to recruit the very best wherever they are. “We are not yet there but we will continue to make the public service more attractive to entice more people from the private sector like it’s happening in countries like Singapore.

He also lauded the efforts of the commission for the tremendous work they have done to make the civil service more active than before. President Koroma indicated that the current moratorium on recruitment in the public service should be looked into because it is also not helping the civil service in terms of capacity building.

Chairman of the PSC Dr Amadu Max Sesay apprised the president about the challenges facing the commission, including budgetary constraints. He highlighted the issue of their modern, purpose-built PSC House to accommodate a new PSC, a PSC with an oversight and regulatory mandate over the public service, saying that although the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development has commenced the disbursement of funds for the project, the allocations are too small to commission even the demolition of the current building. He also mentioned the current moratorium on recruitment in the public service which, he said, “is compounding the situation of unemployment for our graduates”.

Dr Sesay went on to note that history will smile kindly on President Koroma for what the PSC chairman described as waking up the huge constitutional beast (PSC) that went into inglorious slumber for over two decades. “In some of my early writings on the PSC, your Excellency, I have employed the use of the famous fable, Humpty Dumpty, as a metaphor to capture the experience of the institution. Before you, Humpty Dumpty has a great fall. But since 2008, Sir, the President’s men have been busy at work, putting Humpty Dumpty back together again,” said the PSC chairman.

Giving an overview of their 2016 annual report, Dr Max Sesay brought out a number of issues including scaling up internal reforms, supporting human resource management in the civil service, enforcing discipline and accountability in the public service as well as fostering sector and policy collaboration in the public service. These achievements, he said, would not have been possible without a decade of astute, stable, credible, respectable, admirable and iconic leadership of President Koroma.