Opening Remarks by Brigadier (Rtd.) Julius Maada Bio President of the Republic of Sierra Leone at the Joint International Monetary Fund and Ministry of Finance and Economic Development High-Level Forum on Economic Policy Priorities

 Conference Hall, State House, Freetown

Friday April 13, 2018

Mr. Vice President

Members of the Diplomatic and Consular Corps

The IMF Team

Development Partners;

Government Officials/Heads of Ministries, Departments and Agencies

Distinguished Ladies and Gentlemen

I welcome you all.

I am delighted that the International Monetary Fund has resumed their engagement with my new administration by organizing this High-Level Forum on Economic management. Read More

One-Day Presidential Working Visit to Dakar, Senegal on Tuesday, 10th April 2018

SIERRA LEONE GOVERNMENT

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

PRESS RELEASE

 

The Office of the President wishes to inform the general public that His Excellency President Rtd. Brigadier Julius Maada Bio has been graciously invited by the President of the Republic of Senegal, His Excellency Mr. Macky Sall, for a one-day high-level visit to Senegal on Tuesday, 10th April 2018. Read More

NEC updates President Koroma on the March 27 run-off Election

By State House Communication Unit

Following the conduct of the March 7 multi-tier elections, the National Electoral Commission (NEC) yesterday Monday 19th March updated President Dr Ernest Bai Koroma on preparations for the March 27 run-off election between the ruling All People’s Congress (APC) and the main opposition Sierra Leone People’s Party (SLPP). Read More

SIERRA LEONE EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES’ TRANSPARENCY INITIATIVE (SLEITI) 2015

 SIERRA LEONE EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES’ TRANSPARENCY

INITIATIVE (SLEITI)

  SLEITI 2015 EITI REPORT

  FEBRUARY 2018

         

Boas & Associates

P. O. Box   AT 1367

ACHIMOTA-ACCRA.

Republic of Ghana

Telephone: 233 244 32 6838

Email: assoboas@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

                REPUBLIC OF SIERRA LEONE

 

MINISTRY OF MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES

 

DRAFT REPORT

 

 

 

SIERRA LEONE EITI Report

 

 

FEBRUARY 2018



TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS/ACRONYMS. i

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.. ii

1.0 BACKGROUND.. 1

1.2 EITI IN SIERRA LEONE. 1

1.1 OBJECTIVES AND CONTENTS OF THE REPORT. 2

2.0: APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY.. 4

2.0 OVERVIEW OF THE EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY IN SIERRA LEONE. 6

2.1: MINING SECTOR. 6

2.2 LARGE-SCALE MINING OPERATIONS. 7

2.3 OIL/GAS. 7

2.5 ROLES OF GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS. 11

3.0 OVERVIEW OF FISCAL REGIME. 13

SUMMARY OF CORPORATE TAX (AFOREMENTIONED) AND OTHER COST. 15

OIL/GAS SECTOR. 15

3.4.2 Other Fiscal Requirements 16

3.4.3 Institutions 17

3.5 LICENCE ALLOCATION.. 18

3.5.1 Licence Registry. 25

3.4.6 Major Companies in the Oil and Gas Industry – 2016. 26

3.5 CONTRACT DISCLOSURE. 28

3.6 BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP. 29

3.7 STATE PARTICIPATION IN THE EXTRACTIVE SECTOR. 30

4.0 EXPLORATION, PRODUCTION AND EXPORTS. 31

4.1 EXPLORATION UPDATE: 31

4.2 PRODUCTION.. 35

4.2.1 Production Status of Major Mining Operations 36

5.0 REVENUE COLLECTION.. 40

5.1 REVENUE FLOW.. 40

5.1.1 MINING.. 40

5.1.2 Oil/Gas 44

OIL/GAS. 48

5.4 REPORTING COMPANIES AND EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY ENTITIES. 49

5.5 DISCREPANCY.. 49

6.0: OTHER REPORTING PARAMETERS. 50

6.1: MANDATORY AND VOLUNTARY SOCIAL EXPENDITURES. 50

6.2: TRANSPORTATION PAYMENTS. 50

6.3   QUASI-FISCAL EXPENDITURES. 50

7.0 RECONCILITION…………………………………………………………………………………….51

7.1 RESULTS OF RECONCILIATION.. 54

7.2 REVENUE ALLOCATIONAND DISTRIBUTION OF REVENUE……………..…………..….64

8.0 CONTRIBUTION TO THE ECONOMY IN 2015 AND 2016. 65

8.1 EXTRACTIVES CONTRIBUTION TO GDP. 68

9.0 SUB NATIONAL PAYMENTS. 74

9.1 Diamond Area Community Development Fund (DACDF) 75

10.0 OUTCOMES AND IMPACT………………………………………………………………………..78

11.0 OBSERVATION AND RECOMMEDATION…………………………………………..……………80

12.0 CONCLUSION.. 81

APPENDICES. 82

Appendix 1:   Revenue streams used for the determination of materiality in 2015. 83

Appendix 2: List of companies/ extractive industry entities that meet the materiality threshold in 2015. 84

Appendix 3: Out of scope companies/extractive Entities-2015. 85

 


LIST OF TABLES

Table 3.1 Royalty rates applicable in the Mining Sector 13

Table 3.2 Summary of selected Fiscal Application in Sierra Leone. 15

Table 3.3 Summary of Fical Regime in the Oil and Gas Sector 16

Table 3.4 Types of Mining Licenses issued in Sierra Leone. 19

Table 3.5 Licences application for 2015and 2016. 21

Table 3.6 Sierra Leone Petroleum Licensing Update. 24

Table 3.7 African Petroleum Shareholdings 26

Table 3.8 African Petroleum group in Sierra Leone. 27

Table 4.1 Mineral Reserves in Sierra Leone. 34

Table 4.2 Mineral Production in 2015/16. 35

Table 4.3 Iron tenements of Marampa. 37

Table 4.6 Total National Export (2012-2016) 38

Table 5.1 Revenue Streams 42

Table 5.2 Revenue flow during Scoping study. 44 

Table 5.3 Scoping parameter for 2015/2016 SLEITI Report 46

Table 5.4 Selected Mining companies for 2015 and 2016 listed below…………………………………….46

Table 5.5 Revenue streams and receiving Government agencies…………………………………………47

Table 7 1 Unilateral Declaration……………………………………………………………………………55

Table 7.2 reconciliation by Companies……………………………………………………………………56

Table 7.3 Reconciliation by Revenue Streams……………………………………………………………57

Table 7.4 Extractive entity and discrepancies……………………………………………………………..58

Table 7.5 Revenue Streams and discrepancies……………………………………………………………59

Table 8.1 Government revenues from Mining benefits in 2015 and 2016 are listed 66

Table 8.2 Employment Details in 2015. 67

Table 8.3 GDP by Sector (Percentage of GDP at current prices 68

Table 8.4 Contibution of Mining Revenues to Total NRA Collections 69

Table 8.5 National  GDP Growth. 70

Table 8.6 Sections of the budget profile for years 2015-2019. Amounts in Millions of Leones (LeM) 72

Table 9.1 Surface Rental paid by Sierra Minerals in 2015. 74

Table 10.1 Update on prevoius recommendation. 78

LIST OF FIGURES

Figures 4.1 Comparison of Export Values in 2014 and 2015 ….………………………………………….36

Figure 7.1  Total Collection of Revenue streams in 2013/2014/2015. 62 

Figure 8.1 Contribution of Exportibles to National Export -2016. 65

Figure 8.2 Contribuiton of Major Revenue to National Totals -2015. 67 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS/ACRONYMS

 

EITI                                         Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

GGDO                                     Government Gold and Diamond Office

GoSL                                       Government of Sierra Leone

IPAU                                       Integrated Projects Administration Unit

MCO                                       Mining Cadastre Office

MLGRD                                  Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development

MMA                                      Mines and Minerals Act 2009

MMMR                                   Ministry of Mines and Mineral Resources

MOFED                                  Ministry of Finance and Economic Development

NMA                                       National Minerals Agency

PMT                                        Precious Minerals Trading

NRA                                        National Revenue Authority

SLEITI                                    Sierra Leone Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

SLL                                         Sierra Leone Leone

IA                                           Independent Administrator

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is a global initiative that has gained global recognition since its introduction at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, South Africa in 2002.

Sierra Leone joined the EITI in February 2008 and has since produced six (6) reports spanning between 2010 and 2015. Over twenty members constitute the oversight group (MSG) for policy direction of the initiative. A high level commitment has been placed on the Initiative by the Government of Sierra Leone resulting in the positioning of the Chief of Staff at the Presidency as the Chairman and Champion of the Multi-Stakeholder Group.

Sierra Leone has successfully undertaken three Validation exercises and achieved compliance status in April 2014.  The next Validation under the 2016 Standard is scheduled for July 2018.

Sierra Leone is richly endowed with extractive minerals especially mining products such as diamond, gold, iron ore, bauxite etc. The country possesses one of the largest rutile reserves in the world and has significant bauxite reserves. There are large scale mining operations in iron ore, diamonds, rutile and bauxite and an artisanal and small-scale mining of gold and diamonds.

 

Real GDP growth contracted by 21.5 percent in 2015 compared to a growth rate of 4.61percent in 2014. Source: https://www.bsl.gov.sl

Minerals contributed 95% of the total national exports in 2015. Activity in the mining sector slumped by 83.7 percent in 2015. This was attributable, in part, to the decline in global iron ore prices and the closure of the domestic iron ore mining companies

Mineral export went down in 2015 to US$ 358,863,680.68, from US$1,109,239,334.77 in 2014.

Small scale and artisanal gold miners produced 3,460 ounces valued at $ 3.6million in 2015.

The Income Tax Act, 2000 and the Mines and Minerals Act, 2009 are the main legislations regulating the mining sector whereas the Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Act 2011 govern activities in the oil and gas sector.

 

New mining projects were at development stage and 17 new mining applications were received in 2015.

Sierra Leone is not currently an oil producer, but the announcement of a discovery of natural gas and oil in 2010 has sparked the interest of several global oil producers.

In October 2013, Lukoil Overseas announced another discovery of oil in deep-water off the coast of Sierra Leone. Interest in petroleum exploration is being sustained as there are plans to stage Sierra Leone’s Fourth Offshore Petroleum Licensing Round between mid-January and the end of May 2018.

Cooperation from stakeholders for the 2015 reconciliation exercise is commendable though some companies which have relocated since 2015 were unavailable for participation. A materiality threshold of US$170,000 made up of 12 mining companies was fixed for 2015. No oil and gas company participated in 2015 reconciliation as there were no recorded payments in the year.

 

Approved mining revenue streams for inclusion in the 2015 EITI Report are as follow:

  • Mining Licence
  • Exploration Licence
  • Mineral Royalty
  • Corporate tax
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Licence
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring fee.
  • Export duty on diamonds
  • Diamond Exporter’s licence fees.
  • Surface Rent
  • Agricultural Development Fund
  • Community Development Fund
  • Constituency Development Fund

For the oil/gas sector the revenue benefits for reporting are:

 

  • Training fund,
  • Surface rental
  • Technology Bonus
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Licence
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees
  • Signature Bonus
  • Extension fees
  • Sale of geophysical data

 

 Selected mining companies for 2015 SLEITI report

No. TIN Name of extractive Company Mineral Activity
1 1001358-5 KOIDU LTD. DIAMOND PRODUCTION
2 1000672-9 SIERRA RUTILE RUTILE PRODUCTION
3 TIMIS MINING IRON ORE
4 1000672-9 SIERRA MINERALS HOLDINGS LTD BAUXITE PRODUCTION
5 1000351-9 H. M. DIAMONDS DIAMOND EXPORTER
6 TONKOLILI IRON(ORE)SL IRON ORE PRODUCTION
7 S.D STEEL(SL) LTD IRON ORE PRODUCTION
8 AFRICAN RAILS AND PORTS IRON ORE
9 1025212-6 KASSIM BASMA DIAMOND EXPORTER
10 AMARA MINING SL LIMITED -BAOMAHUN GOLD  LIMITED GOLD DEVELOPMENT
11 AMR GOLD SL LTD IRO WILKINSON  HILL MINING
12 1020041-5 SHAWKE B SHOUR DIAMOND EXPORTER


Reconciliation by companies.

Reconciliation of extractive companies and government receipts as presented by companies is shown in the table below

 

No.

Company Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Koidu Ltd          5,620,568        (42,805)      5,577,763         5,601,813                 –     5,601,813          5,577,763        5,601,813        23,186     (47,236)
2 Sierra Rutile Ltd                         –                   –                     –                        –                 –                    –                         –                       –                  –                –
3 Timis Mining Ltd                         –                   –                     –                        –                 –                    –                         –                       –                  –                –
4 Vimetco Sierra Minerals Holding Ltd     2,399,122.67        (87,289)      2,311,834         2,091,990                 –     2,091,990          2,311,834        2,091,990      225,292  (5,448.00)
5 H.M Diamonds     1,773,088.00                   –      1,773,088         1,795,493                 –     1,795,493          1,773,088        1,795,493           1,500     (23,905)
6 S.D STEEL-Tinkolili Iron Ore     1,272,679.00        (15,220)      1,257,459         1,785,008                 –     1,785,008          1,257,459        1,785,008           8,195   (535,744)
7 Kassim M Basma        496,816.00                   –         496,816             496,815                 –        496,815              496,816           496,815                   1                –
9 Cluff-Amara Mining Ltd                         –                   –                     –                        –                 –                    –                         –                       –                  –                –
10 AMR Gold SL LTD                         –                   –                     –                        –                 –                    –                         –                       –                  –                –
11 Shawke B Shour        222,320.19                   –         222,320             222,320                 –        222,320              222,320           222,320                   0                 0
15 Total        11,784,594     (145,314)   11,639,280       11,993,439                 –  11,993,439        11,639,280      11,993,439      258,174   (612,333)

 

 

Reconciliation by Revenue Streams

Reconciliation of extractive companies payments and government receipts as depicted by revenue streams is shown in the table below.

2015 Company Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 2,030,143 0 2,030,143 2,256,957 0 2,256,957 2,030,143 2,256,957 23,186 -250,000
2 Exploration Licence 43,207 0 43,207 43,207 0 43,207 43,207 43,207 0 0
3 Royalty 6,204,466 0 6,204,466 6,215,251 0 6,215,251 6,204,466 6,215,251 1 -10,786
4 Export duty for Diamonds 2,168,841 0 2,168,841 2,168,844 0 2,168,844 2,168,841 2,168,844 0 -3
5 Corporate Tax 216,883 0 216,883 240,784 0 240,784 216,883 240,784 1 -23,902
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 106,500 0 106,500 105,000 0 105,000 106,500 105,000 1,500 0
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 479,011 0 479,011 739,910 0 739,910 479,011 739,910 7,596 -268,495
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 94,283 0 94,283 153,430 0 153,430 94,283 153,430 0 -59,147
9 Surface Rent 223,565 -145,314 78,251 70,056 0 70,056 78,251 70,056 8,195 0
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11 Community Development Fund 217,695 0        217,695                     –              –                 – 217,695                   –      217,695             –
  TOTAL      11,784,594      (145,314)   11,639,280      11,993,439              –  11,993,439 11,639,280    11,993,439      258,174  (612,333)


After the reconciliation, total company receipts amounted to US$ 11,639,280, whilst total government receipts amounted to US$11,993,439.

 

OBSERVATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

  • Timely Completion Of Templates

The NRA could not provide its templates within the stipulated time. Templates were delivered just some few days to the publication of this Report.

  • Recommendation

The NRA is strategically important for the reconciliation process. The major revenue streams including mineral royalty, corporate tax, diamond exporters license fees, mining and exploration licenses are all collected by that Agency. It is therefore very important that its completed template reaches the Independent Administrator in good time to facilitate the reconciliation exercise.

  • Uniform Fiscal Terms

Most mining contracts stabilize the corporate income tax (CIT) rate at 30%. However, for African Minerals Ltd the income tax rate is fixed at 25% or the prevailing rate in the income tax Act 2000.

London Mining Ltd has CIT rate of 6% for the first three years, 25% for the 4th to the 10th year and thereafter reverting to whatever pertains in law but not to exceed 30%.

Koidu Holdings has CIT rate of 35%.

  • Recommendation:

Practicably, in view of dwindling extractive revenues, the MMMR/NMA should endeavor to establish uniform fiscal terms for all mining and petroleum contracts. This should hold especially for the high income earners such as corporate tax and royalty as any tinkering with them could potentially affect extractive revenues. Stabilization clauses could be maintained to the extent that they are hinged on massive investments to the sector.

 

  • Extractive Payments Made on Behalf of Parent Companies

It was observed that some extractive payments were made under different names ie. Parent company, group of companies, subsidiary companies. Shandong Steel Ltd, made payments in the name of Tonkolili (Iron Ore) Ltd or African Railways and Ports Services Ltd, both being subsidiaries of Shandong Steel Ltd.

  • Recommendation:

Payments made on behalf of mineral right holders should be recorded properly against the names of such companies and not the parent/holding companies. Correct company narration aids in the assessment of future project level reporting for extractive companies in Sierra Leone.

  • Appropriate Payment Narration

Payments for some mining benefits were made out in the names of different benefit streams. A case in point is the recording of US$ 18,249,395.02 as payroll tax in 2015. This figure appears too colossal to be realized as taxes on minority foreign employees. PAYE payments could probably have ben categorized as Payroll tax.

  • Recommendation

Strict categorization of payroll tax, PAYE and other payments need to be ensured to facilitate the determination of materiality threshold for extractive companies.

  • Establishment of Mineral Wealth Fund

Mineral royalty receipts slumped from US$30,424,895 in 2014 to a paltry US$9,225,535 in 2015. This was largely due to the fall in the price of iron ore and significant decrease in the volumes of minerals produced. (See Section 4 on production).  This accounted for the reduction in exports from US$1.25bn in 2014 to $536m in 2015, thus collapsing total extractive revenues to $11.7m in 2015.

Similarly, mineral royalties dropped in 2014 compared with 2013 receipts.

 

  • Recommendation

 

With collapsing revenues from Iron Ore impacting heavily on the nations’ extractive incomes, it is recommended that Sierra Leone establishes a Mineral Wealth Fund with possible inputs from revenues accruing during periods of windfall gains. This would undoubtedly provide national budgetary support during times of depressed mineral revenues.

 

  • Capital Gains Tax

A number of high value mining deals have been made in recent years for which possible capital gains taxes could be exacted.

 

  1. West African Minerals Corporation completed the sale of its entire interest (5licenses) in Ferrous Africa Ltd. The buyer Sierra Resources Ltd was to be responsible for any liabilities including rehabilitation and wind-up costs.

 

  1. Shandong Iron and Steel Ltd acquired the remaining 75% stake of the Tonkolili Iron Ore mine from African Minerals in April 2015 for US$170M. It now owns 100% equity in Tonkolili Mine.

 

  1. Cape Lambert is expected to receive a royalty of US$2 per tonne of iron concentrate (Royalty) exported from the Timis Marampa Iron Ore Mine (Mine), which is payable on a quarterly basis on production of 24mt from the Mine. There has not been any development as the end of December 2016.

 

  1. Stellar Diamonds plc, the London quoted diamond company announced that it has signed a legally binding conditional Tribute Mining Agreement and Revenue Share Agreement with Octea Mining Limited. 10% share of gross revenues (after deduction of Government royalty) is payable to Octea once Stellar has recouped an amount equal to its CAPEX investment and Octea has received an initial revenue share payment of US$5 million. Stellar’s has invested US$7.2 million to date on establishing resources at Tongo diamond deposit.

 

  1. Iluka Resources Limited (Iluka) has announced it completed its statutory merger with Sierra Rutile Ltd in December 2016. The total transaction cost of A$393 million, includes the final consideration for SRL equity of A$375 million (£215 million) and A$18 million of transaction costs. Payment was made on 7 December 2016. Iluka has assumed SRL’s net debt of approximately US$59 million, (A$80 million).

Recommendation

It is recommended that NMA and NRA assess these aforementioned transactions meticulously both offshore and in Sierra Leone for possible capital gains taxes for the state.

 

 

 

 

 


1.0 BACKGROUND

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) is a global initiative that has gained global recognition since its introduction at the World summit on Sustainable development in Johannesburg, South Africa in 2002.

Its main objective is to enhance transparency around the generation and spending of revenues from the extractive sector with the stated purpose of improving development outcomes, reduce the potential for corruption or large scale embezzlement of funds and stimulate debate on the utilization of revenues generated from the extractive sector in member countries.

Sierra Leone expressed its intention to join the EITI in June 2006 and was admitted as a Candidate Country in February 2008 and was declared EITI compliant in April 2014.

Between 2006 and 2016, Sierra Leone has produced 6 EITI reports.  The first SLEITI report covered the minerals sector only but the coverage of subsequent reports was expanded to the oil/gas sector.  Having gone through three Validation exercises, Sierra Leone gained EITI compliance in April 2014.  The next Validation under the 2016 Standard is scheduled for July 2018.

This report is the 2015 SLEITI report, which reconciled payments made by the extractive companies and revenues received by the government of Sierra Leone in 2015.

The report also covers the mining/oil and gas sectors in Sierra Leone as well as registers of licences; exploration, production and exports; beneficial ownership; contract transparency; state participation in the extractive sector; revenue collection and allocation; social and economic spending; and the outcomes and impact of the EITI in Sierra Leone.

 

 

1.2 EITI IN SIERRA LEONE

 

The Sierra Leone (MSG) is made up of representatives from the following organizations:

Office of the Chief of Staff

Office of the Vice-President

Civil Society Organizations

Mining Companies

Petroleum Exploration Companies

The National Parliament

National Revenue Authority

The Ministry of Mines and Mineral Resources

The Ministry of Finance and Economic Development

The Ministry of Local Government

The Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources

Petroleum Resources Directorate

Audit Service

Council of Paramount Chiefs

District/City Councils

 

The SLEITI multi-stakeholder group comprises representatives from the Government, extractive companies and civil society organizations. The Chief of staff in the Office of the President Chairs the MSG and acts as the SLEITI Champion.  The SLEITI secretariat, created by the multi-stakeholder group is responsible for implementing the decisions of the group.

 

Some of the recent developments in SLEITI implementation have been the publication of the Sierra Leone Beneficial Ownership Roadmap, the SLEITI Open Data Policy and the SLEITI 2014 Report. Most recently, a legal and institutional review was undertaken to establish where gaps exist in meeting the EITI Beneficial Ownership requirement to enable mandatory BO disclosure by January 2020.

1.1  OBJECTIVES AND CONTENTS OF THE REPORT

 

The objectives of the report include the following;

  1. To Collect, Analyze and Aggregate payments made by Mining/Oil and Gas companies to the Government of Sierra Leone
  2. To Reconcile extractive companies’ submissions of Mining/Oil and Gas payments to those received by Government.
  3. To produce a report covering the 2015 financial year in accordance with the 2016 EITI Standard.

Areas covered in the report include:

  1. Approach and Methodology
  2. Overview of the extractive sector in Sierra Leone
  • Reconciliation scope and results.
  1. Observations and Recommendations and
  2. Conclusions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.0: APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY

The assignment was composed of two main phases:

  • The preliminary information gathering /inception phase which included a scoping study.

 

  • Reconciliation phase.

The preliminary information gathering stage involved interactions with stakeholders in order to put the assignment into the correct perspective and establish reporting timelines. A scoping study was undertaken by the Independent Administrator to identify the reporting parameters.

After the scoping study parameters including the following were identified and agreed with the MSG.

  • Threshold for reporting or materiality
  • Reporting entities (Extractive and Government)
  • Relevant revenue streams
  • Reporting Template
  • Necessary information required from participants in order to assure credibility in fulfillment of requirement 5.2(c) of the EITI standards.
  • Guidelines for the completion of templates.
  • Schedule for publishing the EITI Report.

Document review

In addition to information sourced from the world-wide-web and also data obtained from government, the following were reviewed.

  • Mines & Minerals Act 2009/Regulations
  • Petroleum (Exploration & Production Act) 2011 and others[1].

 

Document review and desk top study was undertaken throughout the duration of the assignment, and aided greatly in the provision of contextual information.

This preliminary/inception phase culminated in the production of a scoping report and an inception report by the Independent Administrator which confirmed all the agreed reporting parameters.

The reconciliation phase involved

  1. Data collection and Analysis
  2. Initial reconciliation
  • Draft reporting and
  1. Final reporting

The activities undertaken at the reconciliation phase are detailed in section 4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.0 OVERVIEW OF THE EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY IN SIERRA LEONE

 

Sierra Leone has a long history of mining and the sector has long featured prominently in the country’s economy.

 

There are large scale mining operations in iron ore, diamonds, rutile and bauxite as well as small-scale and artisanal mining of gold and diamonds.

 

The country possesses one of the largest rutile reserves in the world and has significant bauxite reserves in its Southern part.

 

Other identified minerals include platinum, chromite, lignite, clays, and base metals (copper, nickel, molybdenum, lead, and zinc).

 

The upstream oil and gas activity is however in the exploration phase occurring off shore and parceled into 14 blocks.

2.1: MINING SECTOR

 

The significance of the mining sector in Sierra Leone is reflected by its contribution to GDP (2.7 percent) and registered exports (71 percent) in 2016. According to Statistics Sierra Leone, mining and quarrying provided a livelihood for more than 82,000 people, and directly or indirectly employed about 3 percent of the total labor force.

 

Sierra Leone produced 2.2 million tons of iron ore worth $77.3m in 2015 compared with 18.8million tons in 2014. The 2015 production was 11% of the 2014 production and was mainly attributable to iron ore price slump which remained depressed through 2016.

Mining is categorised into three types, namely artisanal, small scale and large scale mining   licenses.

It includes three types of mining licences: artisanal (issued by the Director of Mines), small-scale and large-scale operations (issued by the Minister of Mineral Resources). Regarding large-scale mining operations, the Minister has the legal right to, on behalf of the holder of a mining permit, compulsorily acquire the land or land-lease required for mining exploration.

 

Regarding artisanal and small-scale mining, the consent of the owner or the rightful occupier or the Chiefdom Mining Allocation Committee is required (Sections 85:2 (c) and 96: (b)) of MMA Act 2009. Under Section 31(1) (b) of the 2009 Act, mining is not allowed in land set apart for any public purpose without the consent of the relevant government authorities

 

2.2 LARGE-SCALE MINING OPERATIONS

There were four large scale mines in Sierra Leone in operation at end of December 2016. These collectively contributed about 74% of the total fiscal benefits from mining in 2016. (See Appendix.4) 

  1. Shandong Iron and Steel Group

Shandong Iron and steel group operates the Tonkolili mine which produces iron ore.

  1. Sierra Rutile Ltd

Sierra Rutile Ltd. operates the rutile mines in Moyamba and Bonthe.

  1. Sierra Mineral Holdings Limited (SMHL)

SMHL is a subsidiary of Vimetco N. V. It mines bauxite and exports to ALUM, a Romania-based company within the group which processes the mineral into aluminum.

 

  1. Octea (Koidu Limited).

Koidu Limited runs a large-scale diamond operation in the Koidu area in Kono district.

Artisanal Mining and Small Scale Mining (ASM)

Small scale and artisanal mining is concentrated on gold and diamonds operations. In the absence of large scale gold mine all the gold output was from this mining category. Diamonds winning from ASM contributed significantly to the total country production.

According to the Sierra Leone Working Group of Monitors of the Kimberley Process Certification artisanal diamond production was 225,334 carats and accounted for 36.33% of total export in 2014.[2]

In 2015 small scale and artisanal gold miners produced 3,460 ounces valued at $ 3.6million. In 2016, the gold production was valued at $ 4.3million.

2.3 OIL/GAS

Sierra Leone is not currently an oil producer, but the announcement of a discovery of natural gas and oil in 2010 has sparked the interest of several global oil producers.

In October 2013, Lukoil Overseas announced another discovery of oil in deep-water off the coast of Sierra Leone. The current price of oil continues to be unfavorable to commercial viability in Sierra Leone due to the current cost of extraction in deep-water and as a result the sector is experiencing downturn in activity and interest at present.                                                                 Source: iati.dfid.gov.uk /iati documents/5733512.odt

The Petroleum Directorate has announced the opening of their newly created ‘Data Room. In 2017, the Directorate took ownership of its 3D seismic datasets which were previously available through a seismic contractor. Subsequently the directorate partnered with the Getech Group and government advisory subsidiary ERCL to ensure that all the exploration datasets are available through the Data Room to provide the maximum amount of information and value. The datasets include never before available PSDM seismic and well data from the exploration phase during 2009 to 2013. Source: http://www.exprodat.com/news/sierra-leones-star-set-shine

Sierra Leone has also announced a fourth Offshore Petroleum Licensing Round scheduled to take place between mid-January and the end of May 2018. The licensing round will be exclusively supported by the Getech, a group which has been working with the Petroleum Directorate since 2016 providing data required to review Sierra Leone’s proven prospectivity

2.4 INSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL FRAMEWORK

MINING SECTOR

The Sierra Leonean mining sector has undergone a number of legal reforms over the last few years to promote transparency, local content and stronger governance, while also encouraging foreign investments:

  1. The Environment Protection Agency Act 2008 (EPA Act), which provides that mining projects can only be undertaken following the preparation and approval of an environmental impact assessment and the issuance of an environmental impact assessment licence.5
  2. The Mineral and Mines Act (MMA, 2009 Act) provides details on how mining is to be conducted in Sierra Leone. It establishes a modern Cadastral system for issuing, registering and surveying mining operations. The Act provides that all rights of ownership and control of minerals in Sierra Leone including its continental shelf are vested in the Republic not withstanding any other ownership rights.
  1. The National Minerals Agency Act, 2012

This establishes the National Minerals Agency which promotes the development of the minerals sector by effectively and efficiently managing mineral rights and minerals trading in Sierra Leone, including geological survey and data collection activities. It also establishes the National Minerals Agency Board to provide technical support to the agency. The Act also empowers the Agency for the full implementation of the Diamonds Kimberly Certification Scheme.

 

  1. The Mines and Minerals Operational Regulations Of July 2013

This regulation provides for requirements in relation to surface, open pit and underground mining operations, reporting of mineral resources, health and safety standards, waste disposal, as well as explosives and blasting.

 

 

  1. The Environment Protection (Mines and Minerals) Regulations Of July 2013

 

It provides for a number of obligations in relation to the environmental permitting process, environmental standards, grievance mechanisms and mine closure, as well as guidance on the contents of the environmental impact assessment reports and the environmental management plans.

 

  1. Customs Act 2011

This Act modernizes and simplifies the law relating to the prohibition and control of the importation and exploitation of certain goods. Customs  Act  2011  is  the  principal  legislation  administered  by  the Sierra  Leonean Customs  Service   under  the  National  Revenue  Authority to  manage  the  movement  of  goods  into  and  out  of  Sierra  Leone.

 

  1. Finance Act 2015

Passed into effect on the 1st January 2015, it provides for royalties, taxes and export duty for all minerals including diamonds.

  1. Finance Act 2016

The Act aims to provide for the imposition and alteration of taxes, duties and excise, and for other related matters.   Key amendments in Finance Act 2016 include 5% addition to the existing 30% PAYE tax (now 35%); and also amendment to certain sections in the Income Tax Act, 2000; the Excise Act 1982; and the Finance Act of 2006 and 2011 respectively.

  1. Finance Bill 2017

 

This bill outlines the proposed changes to the following:

(i) the Income Tax Act 2000; (ii) the Goods and Services Tax Act 2009; (iii) the Payroll Tax Act 1972; (iv) the Excise Act 1982; (v) the Customs Act 2011; (vi) the Customs Tariff Act 1978; and (vii) other amendments to various Finance Acts.

 

The 2017 Finance Bill will also among others revise the presumptive income tax regime for alluvial gold and diamond mining activities; It seeks to limit income tax loss carry forward to 10 years, clarifies and broadens the definition of chargeable assets for purposes of determining when and how Capital Gains Tax applies.

 

  1. Diamond Cutting and Polishing Act

The Act provides for the control of diamond cutting and polishing, the licensing of diamond cutters and polishers. To define the rights and duties of a licensee. It has detailed provisions for the control of diamond cutting and polishing including licensing. Others include financial matters such as duty payable, valuation fees, customs duty exemption.

  1. Diamond Trading Act

The new Diamond Trading Act strengthens the framework governing the trade of rough diamonds and ensures full compliance with the Kimberley Process.

 

  1. Public Financial Management Act

The Public Financial Management (PFM) Act 2016 was passed by Parliament on 21st July 2016) to accrue the following benefits:

  • Management of extractive industries revenues.
  • Provide fiscal rule for the management of extractive industries revenues.
  • Establishment of Transformational Development Stabilization Fund.
  • Deposits to, and withdrawal from, Transformational Development Stabilization Fund.
  • Establishment of the Intergenerational Savings Fund, and Transformational Development Stabilization Fund.
  • Deposits to, and withdrawal from Intergenerational Savings Fund

Source: www.cabri-sbo.org

  1. Local Content Act

Sierra Leone passed the Local Content Act 2016 which provides for the promotion of Sierra Leone products and services and for the establishment of the Sierra Leone Local Content Agency and the Local Content Development Fund.

The Ministry of Mines and Mineral Resources also began preparing a new Core Minerals Policy (CMP) in line with the Africa Mining Vision (AMV) in June 2016.              Source: www.uneca.org

 UPDATE ON REFORMS IN THE EXTRACTIVE SECTOR (2015 & 2016)

 

  1. The revised Precious Minerals Trading Act was approved by Cabinet in 2015 yet still awaits ratification in Parliament;
  2. The new draft Minerals Policy has been finalised and requires  nationwide consultation, Cabinet approval, and then Parliamentary ratification;
  3. The Extractives Industries Revenue Bill originally drafted in 2015, still needs parliamentary ratification. Consensus has however been built following an IMF sponsored seminar held between 19th and 24th July,2017 in Freetown.

 

  1. The Resettlement Policy has been the subject of studies and consultation, including a major exercise with affected communities in Lunsar, and was finalized in 2015.

 

  1. The Artisanal Mining Policy has been drafted in 2017 and will now need to meet cabinet approval and ratification by parliament.
  2. A revised Petroleum and Gas Law was drafted in 2016, but is currently awaiting parliamentary ratification.
  3. Sierra Leone is now participating in the Natural Resource Charter benchmarking exercise. The Natural Resource Charter is a set of principles for governments and societies on how to best harness the opportunities created by extractive resources for development.

 

  1. The Land Rehabilitation Study and the Capacity Building Assessment and Training Program for the MMMR have now been satisfactorily finalized for implementation.

 

  1. A Management and Functional Review (MFR) of MMMR to clarify roles and responsibilities between the NMA and the Ministry was completed in 2015 and recommendations accepted and taken forward by both institutions.

Source: iati.dfid.gov.uk/iati_documents

2.4.1 Fiscal Devolution

The Local Government Act 2004 is the legal framework for the effective running and administration of local councils. The Local Government (Assumption of Functions) Regulations 2004 guide the process of devolution. This legislation specifies 80 functions to be devolved from central to local government, designates the devolving central ministry, department or agency.

 

The Chieftaincy Act 2009 makes provision for the election of paramount chiefs and sub-chiefs.

Local government operates in a single tier with 13 district councils and six city councils. All

19 local councils are governed by the Local Government Act 2004, which gives councils

legislative, financial and administrative powers.

 

The Local Government Act 2004 gives both local councils and chiefdom councils powers

to raise revenue from sources including local taxes, property rates, licences, fees and charges,

and to receive mining revenue, interest and dividends etc. The chiefdom councils also have

traditional sources of revenue, mainly local taxes and fees from local markets.

 

Apart from payments from licenses, permits, dues, charges or fees specified by local government by-laws, there is no fiscal devolution in Sierra Leone

2.5 ROLES OF GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS

Ministry of Mines, Mineral Resources  

 

The Ministry of Mines and Mineral Resources (MMMR) oversees the issuance of all mineral

rights and the administration and supervision of all activities under these rights, and administers

regulations on mining and marketing of precious minerals through the Precious Mineral Trading.

 

National Minerals Agency

 

 

The National Minerals Agency was established in 2012 by the National Minerals Agency Act 2012. It is mandated to administer and enforce the Mines and Minerals Act, 2009 and any other acts related to the trade in minerals.

 

Environmental Protection Agency

 

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established through the Environmental Protection Agency Act (2008).  It has the goal of creating and enforcing a strict regulatory framework for environmental regulation in Sierra Leone. It has the mandate to coordinate, monitor and evaluate the implementation of national environmental policies, programmes and projects, including issuing Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) licenses.

 

National Revenue Authority (NRA)

 

Established in September 2002 , under  an Act of Parliament, the National Revenue Authority Act, 2002 (Act No-11), the National Revenue Authority in Sierra Leone has the responsibility of assessing and collecting domestic taxes, customs duties and other revenues specified by law, as well as administering and enforcing laws related to these revenues.(nra.gov.sl).

 

For the EITI scoping/reconciliation assignment the NRA provided data on royalty, mining/ exploration licenses, corporate income tax and diamond exporters’ license.

 

 

Ministry of Local Government & Rural Development

Local government is provided for by the Local Government Act 2004. The Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development is responsible for local government, which comprises six urban councils (Freetown, Bo, Kenema, Makeni, Koidu and Bonthe) and 13 district councils. In the third sphere of government there are chiefdom councils.

The local authorities and chiefdom councils have revenue-raising powers, and they do levy property taxes and licence fees for mining activities in host communities.

Chiefdoms and District Councils

 

 

The paramount chiefs and ruling families in the chiefdoms have been recognized and empowered by Sierra Leone’s British Colonial Administration.  The chiefs have the power to raise taxes, to some extent influence the judicial system and allocate land in the rural areas.  Several chiefdoms have been constituted into a district council. These sub national government agencies receive surface rentals from mining companies. These include Kono District, Tonkolili District Council, Upper Banta and Tankoro Chiefdoms.

3.0 OVERVIEW OF FISCAL REGIME

MINING SECTOR.

The main fiscal tools in the mining sector are corporate income tax and mineral royalty which are regulated by MMA, 2009 and the Income Tax Act 2000 as well as relevant regulations and amendments.

The MMA 2009 and ITA 2000 informs and govern fiscal rates in the mining sector unless otherwise stipulated in some special mining agreements.

Tables 3.1 and 3.2 details the mineral royalty rates and corporate tax respectively as provided for in the MMA, 2009 and the Income Tax Act 2000 as well as other relevant amendments. Royalty and corporate tax being highlighted by virtue of their variety in rate applications and of course its relative fiscal importance to the state.

   Table 3.1 Royalty rates applicable in the mining sector

 Royalty Type of Licence Category of Mineral Rate (%) Remarks*
    All Special Stones 15 By Finance Act, 2015 rate reduced to 3%. Value of Stones above US$ 500,000. Rate also negotiable under Special Agreements.
  Large & Small Scale Precious Stones 6.5
  Artisanal 3.0 Rate for Artisanal introduced by Finance Act, 2015
  Large & Small Scale Precious Metals 5.0
  Artisanal 3.0 Rate for Artisanal Sources introduced by Finance Act,2015
  All All other Minerals 3.0

 

Corporate Income Tax

Corporate Income tax rate is 30% on profits: Additional 3.5% is on turnover where chargeable income is below 7% of turnover in a year. This excludes acceptable audited account holders

Most mining contracts stabilize the corporate income tax (CIT) rate at 30%. However for African Minerals Ltd the income tax rate is fixed at 25% or the prevailing rate in the income tax Act 2000. London Mining Ltd has CIT rate of 6% for three years, 25% for the 4th to the 10th year and thereafter reverting to whatever pertains in law but not to exceed 30%. Koidu Holdings has CIT rate of 35%.

 

 

Mining Fees:  Payments made by extractive sector entities in the mining sector include:

  1. Exploration license
  2. Mining license
  3. Surface Rental
  4. Environmental Impact Assessment fees
  5. Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees
  6. Agricultural Development Fund/Community Development Fund

 

Other Taxes

Other significant taxes levied on consumption are value-added taxes, personal income taxes and sales taxes. The Excise Act 1982 governs excise duties and the Goods and Services Tax Act 2009 (GSTA) which provides for the imposition of a broad based tax on the consumption of goods and services.

 

Deductible Expenses

 

The general rule for allowing the deduction of an expense for income tax purposes is if it is wholly, exclusively and necessary for the creation of the income. There are various deductibles in the contracts.

For instance, costs of food, drinks and other items provided to employees in job related accommodation, as well as expenses for celebrating milestones are deductible without any capping in the case of Sierra Minerals Holdings Ltd .However marketing costs for Koidu Ltd are not deductible for income tax purposes

 

Ring Fencing

 

The Mines and Minerals Act 2009, section 155(1) indicates that chargeable assessments are ring fenced by mining lease. However section 155(4) also provides that with the approval of the Minister, the holder of a mining lease may deduct exploration or reconnaissance expenditure incurred in Sierra Leone from income of a mining lease before determining the chargeable income. Effectively, it means there is no ring fencing as only development and capital costs outside the lease area will not be deducted from income from mining activity.

 

The current arrangement may also give undue advantage to current producing companies in the acquisition of reconnaissance and exploration rights, especially as the licencing regime is on first come first served basis. The producing company has income to offset its exploration costs against, and would therefore be encouraged to acquire more exploration licences.

Capital Gains Tax: Capital gains tax seeks to ensure that the country benefits from gains made on disposal of interest, by holders of mineral rights.

SUMMARY OF CORPORATE TAX (AFOREMENTIONED) AND OTHER COST APPLICATIONS

 

Table 3.2 below contains corporate tax rates and other cost applications.

 

Table 3.2 Summary of selected Fiscal Application in Sierra Leone

Item Description Applicable Rate
Corporate Tax 30% tax rate on corporate profits

Additional 3.5% on turnover where chargeable income is below 7% of turnover in a year. Excludes acceptable audited account holders

Cost Amortisation for Exploration 4 year profiled depreciation at 40%, 20%, 20%, 20% respectively, starting in the year the cost was incurred
Thin Capitalisation Where the debt equity ratio exceeds 3:1, interest on loans granted by affiliated parties shall not apply
Limits on HQ Expenses 1.5% of sales
Special Tax Incentives Losses can be carried forward from one year to the next up to 10yrs from the commencement of commercial production

OIL/GAS SECTOR

 Description of fiscal regime, laws, reforms and regulations

The main legislation governing petroleum exploration and production activity in Sierra Leone is the Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Act 2011 (the “E&P Act”).

 

Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Act 2011

 

Section (2)(1) of the E&P Act vests all rights of ownership in and control of petroleum (i.e. crude oil or natural gas or a combination of both) in its natural state in, under or upon any land of Sierra Leone in the Republic of Sierra Leone.

 

Licenses are allocated through a tendering process, and are the product of negotiations between the licencee and the Government of Sierra Leone, but will contain detailed provisions including regulatory, development and production provisions captured in clauses found within the model petroleum agreement.

General Fiscal Regime of the Petroleum Industry

The upstream oil and gas sector has a fiscal regime comprising of a Concession and Production Sharing Agreement (hybrid).

The Fiscal Regime of the oil and gas sector comprises three key instruments; (i) Royalty; (ii) Income Tax and (iii) Petroleum Resource Rent Tax (PRRT). These, together with other complementing provisions, form the overall fiscal regime for Sierra Leone’s hydrocarbon industry. The following are specific rules that apply:

Table 3.3 Summary of Fiscal Regime in the Oil and Gas Sector

Type of Agreement Hybrid Royalty-Tax Agreement
Corporate Income Tax 30%
Exploration Period Seven (7) years consisting an initial exploration period of 3 years with two (2) extension periods contingent on fulfillment of Work and Financial Obligations of each of the two (2) renewal periods
Work Programme Negotiable, based on minimum expenditure
Relinquishment Licensee cannot retain more than 50% of licensed area after the initial exploration period and no more than 25% after the first extension period
Royalties (Oil) Water depths up to 200 metres 10.0%
Water depths over 200 metres 8.0%
Royalties (Gas) Water depths up to 200 metres 5.0%
Water depths over 200 metres 3.0%
Surface Rental Initial Exploration Period US $40 per sq. Km. per Annum
1st Extension Period US $60 per sq. km. per annum
2nd Extension Period US $85 per sq. km. per annum
Development and Production US $110 per sq. km. per annum

http://www.slsolutions.org/investment-opportunities/oil-gas/

3.4.2 Other Fiscal Requirements

 

Training Fees: Section 89 of the Exploration & Production Act requires every licensee to pay into the Training, Research and Development Fund an annual training, research and development fee, as provided in the License.

 

In the tender document for third licensing bid round in 2012 it was stated that all companies must pay a minimum annual training fee of US$ 200,000.00 per annum.

 

Capital Gains Tax: the Income Tax Act provides for taxation of the premium received by the assignor in the assignment of any participating interest in a License

 

Petroleum Resource Rent Tax (PRRT): This is a progressive tax instrument. The PRRT has a legislative basis (both in the E&P Act and Income Tax Act).

 

Assignment Fees:  During any exploration period, if the licensee assigns in whole or in part its rights, privileges, duties and obligations to any assignee other than an Affiliate, the licensee shall pay to the Petroleum Directorate the sum equivalent to an assignment fee of US$1,000,000.

 

During any development or production period, if the licensee assigns in whole or in part its rights, privileges, duties and obligations to any assignee other than an Affiliate, the licensee shall pay to the Petroleum Directorate an assignment fee of US$2,000,000.

 

If there is an assignment to an Affiliate of any of the entities constituting a licensee during any exploration or development phase, the licensee shall pay to the Petroleum Directorate an assignment fee of US$500,000.

3.4.3 Institutions

 

The Petroleum Directorate and the National Revenue Authority are the two institutions that are relevant for revenue collection purposes.

 

The Petroleum Directorate

The Petroleum Directorate was established in 2011 within the amendment of the Petroleum Exploration and Production Act of 2011.

The Directorate’s responsibilities include:

  • Coordinating the award of licenses
  • Negotiating the terms of licenses
  • Monitoring, regulating and facilitating upstream activities on behalf of the state
  • Developing regulations from the beginning of exploration to decommissioning

In managing the petroleum resources on behalf of the state, the Directorate reports directly to the President.

Following a successful collaboration with TGS Nopec, ownership of a series of 3D seismic surveys acquired by TGS under a multi-client agreement has now reverted to the Petroleum Directorate. The surveys include the Blocks 4 & 5 survey (2008), the Blocks 3, 4A, 4B / 4A Extension (2011 / 14) and the merged Fusion 3D dataset.

At the pre-production stage in the petroleum industry, the Petroleum Directorate is responsible for the collection of virtually all the revenues within the sector.

National Revenue Authority

The National Revenue Authority in Sierra Leone administers most of the taxes payable in Sierra Leone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.5 LICENSE ALLOCATIONS

 

Mining Sector

The Mining sector licensing regime operates on a first- come first- served system. The National Minerals Agency is the principal point of contact for the general public in all mineral rights matters. It consists of the Mining Cadastre Office (MCO) and the Geographical Information System (GIS), which holds the cadastral survey map of Sierra Leone.

The licensing process is divided into three broad areas

 

    Application Stage

 

  • This commences with an applicant identifying a plot of land.

 

  • Filling application forms (downloading on line) and submitting it to the cadastral office of the National Minerals Agency with the necessary attachments. These attachments include the audited financial statements of the corporate body, certificate of incorporation, technical and financial proposals.

 

  • The details submitted are entered into the cadastral system.

 

  • An application number is generated which is based on the sequence of arrival. This number is unique and automatically generated.

 

Validation Stage

 

  • This process is to ensure that the same plot is not submitted for two applicants.
  • The details of a plot in the system are sent to the Geological survey.
  • The Geological survey superimposes the plot on the existing mineral right map of Sierra Leone, using coordinates.

 

  • The result of the overlay above will indicate if the plot is available, requires some adjustment or is not available.

 

Approval Stage

 

  • The approval of mineral rights is made by the Minister of Mines and Mineral Resources on the recommendation of the Minerals Advisory Board. However reconnaissance licenses do not go to the Minerals Advisory Board. After validation applications for reconnaissance licenses are sent to the Director of Mines for recommendation to the Minister.
  • The cadastral office draws out a list of validated applications
  • The Board makes a decision and communicates to the cadastral office on whether an application has been approved or rejected.
  • After approval, the applicant is notified accordingly.
  • Applicant has to write to accept the offer.
  • The cadastral office is then directed by the Director of Mines to issue an instruction for payment.
  • Applicant is informed of amount to pay.
  • The payment which is computed by taking into consideration the size of the concession in square kilometers by the cadastral office is then paid to the National Revenue Authority office located at the Ministry of Mines and Mineral Resources,

 

Table 3.4: Types of Mining Licenses issued in Sierra Leone

Type of Licence Description
Reconnaissance  A reconnaissance license which is the first stage in the mining enterprise entitles the   holder to search for all minerals by geological, geophysical and geochemical means.

In general, reconnaissance licenses do not permit drilling, excavation, or other physical      activities on the land, except where such activity is specifically mentioned by the license.

A reconnaissance area shall not exceed 10,000(ten thousand) square kilometers.

The license is granted for one year and renewed for another year.

Exploration License Exploration license which covers the second stage of mining operations entitles the holder to search for stipulated minerals and to determine their extent and economic value.

This license is granted initially for 4 years with a first extension for 3years and a further extension for 2 years, making up a total of 9 years.

The size of concession granted for the first 4 years is a maximum of 250 (km)2. This size is halved from the 4th year onwards i.e. 125km2. If one holds more than 125km2 then the license fees required is increased.

Small Scale Mining License The small scale mining license is granted for a maximum of 100 hectares for an initial period of 3 years. There should be 25% Sierra Leonean ownership for license to be issued.
Large Scale Mining License The large scale mining license is granted for a period of 25 years. The license is reviewed every 5 years.

 

Technical and financial criteria: The National Minerals Agency is mandated to ensure licensee exploitation of the nation’s minerals resources and need to be satisfied that no licensee will block exploitation through a lack of technical or financial capacity or unable to meet the liabilities and obligations of the Agency.

Section 70(b) and (c) of MMA, 2009 states that prospective applicants for exploration licenses shall contain the company profile and history of exploration operations in Sierra Leone and elsewhere  and  identify the name and qualifications of the person responsible for supervising the proposed program of exploration operations.

Section 70(f) stipulates that applications be accompanied by a statement giving particulars of the technical and financial resources available to the applicant, and a certified copy of its audited accounts for the year immediately preceding the application.

 

There are, therefore, financial criteria which require NMA to carry out financial checks on the licensee and, where appropriate, on the corporate group to which the licensee belongs.

There is no set guidance on the determination of financial capabilities however documents such are bank statement (with a minimum balance of $50,000), letters from banks confirming good financial standing of applicants or letters from banks of parent or sister companies committing to support applicant to undertake the proposed exploration/mining program are routinely required.

Other criteria such as technical know- how including the licensee’s managerial competence is required. Request for the qualification and experience of senior management is to be complied.

 

In the case of applications for mining lease, Section 105(j) of the MMA, 2009 outlines some of the financial criteria such as detailed forecast of capital investment, operating costs and revenues and the anticipated type and source of financing.

 

Companies covered in the EITI Report: The Mining companies covered in the 2015 Report obtained their licenses prior to the period under review. All these companies had licenses granted to them on first come first served basis. There were no licenses relinquishments and transferred licenses in those held by 2015 In Scope mining companies.

 

Legal and institutional Framework on Licensing:

 

Section 2(1) of the MMA, 2009 states that all rights of ownership in and control of minerals in, under or upon any land in Sierra Leone and its continental shelf are vested in the Republic.

 

Section 29(2) of the MMA, 2009 also confers the power to dispose of mineral right applications for a reconnaissance licence, exploration licence, small-scale mining licence or a large-scale mining licence expeditiously. This is carried out on the advice of the Minerals Advisory Board.

 

The institutional framework has been outlined in the MMA, 2009 under Part III Administration of the Act. See http://www.sierra-leone.org/Laws/2009-12.pdf

 

Deviations from the applicable legal and regulatory framework: Section 49 grants the public unrestricted access to information on any license. It stipulates that the register of mineral rights applications, the cadastral survey map of mineral rights and applications,  shall be open to inspection by members of the public.

 

There are no deviations from Mines and Minerals Act or its associated regulations significantly known or reported on during 2015 which seeks to prevent some companies from making full disclosures of their activities

 

Efficiency: The mineral rights acquisition and licensing system is quite transparent and efficient

3.5.1 Licence Registry

Section 40 of MMA, 2009 enforces the establishment of a minerals cadaster Office which variously ensure the maintenance of the following:

(a) Register of mineral rights;

(b) Register of mineral rights applications;

(c) Cadastral survey map of mineral rights and mineral rights applications

Section 40(2) stipulates that the mining cadastre be include a computerised system involving a spatially related database for registering and administering mineral rights and mineral rights applications.

Section 40(3) requires the Mining Cadastre Office to officially confirm mineral rights and generate certificates.

Sierra Leone has a web based cadastre system, Mining cadastre Administration System (MCAS) which provides information on the above parameters, i.e. License holders, coordinates, application dates and duration of license in support of the NMA in the management of mineral rights. In addition to the MCAS an online repository (See http://sierraleone.revenuesystems.org) also provides information on payments (license) made during the year.  The MCAS does not include information from the Oil and Gas sector.

There were 17 mining applications in 2015.  Below are the summary of license application status as at 1st Sept 2017. (See Table 3.4).

Table 3.5 Licenses Application for 2015

  2015  
  Applications Active License as at 1st Sept 2017
No. of Mining Applications 17 8
o/w  Explorations 13 8
 o/w  Large Scale Mining Lease 1 0
o/w Small Scale Mining 3 0
Diamond Dealers 132 48
Gold Dealers 43 6
Industrial & Sand Based Exporter 56 14
No. of Mining Concession Transferred
No. Of Mining Concession Cancelled

Source: http://sierraleone.revenuesystems.org

In accordance with Section 49, NMA maintains a register of mineral rights applications, the cadastral survey map of mineral rights and applications, and it  open to inspection by members of the public

 

Accessibility Guidance: The Register is available at the Ministry of Mines and Minerals Resources. Information at the Data Rooms can be accessed electronically by link https://sierraleone.revenuedev.org/login

Legal or practical barriers: There are no legal barriers to the comprehensive disclosure of information on the register.

Section 49 grants the public unrestricted access to information on any license. It stipulates that, the register of mineral rights applications, the cadastral survey map of mineral rights and applications,  shall be open to inspection by members of the public.

 

Gaps in the Register: The current online mining register at the Ministry of Mines and Mineral Resources though regularly updated could be improved with additional information on contracts and agreements.

Allocation of Oil and Gas License

Licence shall be granted to an individual or a company registered or incorporated under the Companies Act 2009 of the Laws of Sierra Leone as a body corporate registered under the Companies Act 2009 or as a registered branch of an overseas company under the Companies Act 2009.

 

Applications for a License can be made in the following circumstances: (a) prequalification; or (b) through a call for tenders.

 

The details of licensing costs are not provided in the E&P Act but rather in the official tender document issued by the Petroleum Directorate. In the call for tender for the third licensing bid round Application fees of US$ 25,000.00 was charged per oil block upon submission of application.

 

Where the application is successful and this leads to the execution of a license agreement, surface rent per annum is payable as indicated. A License granted under the E&P Act shall be valid for a maximum period of thirty years from the effective date, unless sooner cancelled or terminated as provided under the Act.

 

The License is comprised of an exploration period and production period. An exploration period shall last for a maximum of seven years, which shall be divided into an initial period of three years, a first extension period and a second extension period of up to two years each. A License granted by the Minister responsible for the management of petroleum matters becomes valid and binding on the parties only after it is ratified by the Parliament of Sierra Leone.

 

Assignment

 

A licensee is prohibited from directly or indirectly assigning its interest in a petroleum interest, whether in whole or in part, to a third party or affiliate without the prior written approval of the Minister. The E&P Act makes it mandatory for a License to provide that a licensee wishing to assign, sell or transfer its interest, whether in part or in whole shall give the right of first refusal to the State of Sierra Leone to acquire the interest at the same price as agreed with a potential purchaser.

 

Abandonment and Decommissioning

 

The Petroleum Directorate is the body charged with regulating the decommissioning of oil and gas facilities No security deposits are required in respect of future decommissioning liabilities. However, there shall be a fund to be used only for decommissioning (the “Decommissioning Fund”). The first contribution shall not be made prior to the commencement of production

 

Licensing and Award of Oil Blocks 

2003/2004 Round

The first round of oil block awards was in 2003/2004. A number of companies carried out additional exploratory activities. The consortium comprising Anardarko, Repsol and Tullow Oil acquired 3D seismic data and progressed to drill 2 wells up to 18,000ft in 9,500ft of water between 2005 and 2010.

Three more groups, Lukoil, Talisman and African Petroleum have acquired 3D seismic data, which are being interpreted and evaluated.

Until 2012, the main actors in the petroleum sector were: (i) Anardaro/Repsol/Tullow Oil; (ii) Talisman/Prontina; (iii) Lukoil/Oranto; (iv) Young Energy Prize; and (v) African Petroleum.

2012 Licensing Round

In August 2012 a new round of Oil Block Tender was completed, which saw the award of 9 more Petroleum Blocks to a range of companies. This process involved a total of 59 applications and summarised as well as other pertinent information

2015 and 2016 Period

No licence was awarded or amended during this period.

Proposed 2018 Licensing Round

Sierra Leone’s Fourth Offshore Petroleum Licensing Round will take place between mid-January and the end of May 2018.

This was announced by the Director General of the Petroleum Directorate of Sierra Leone (PDSL) Raymond Kargbo during the Africa Oil Week Conference in Cape Town, South Africa.

The licensing round will be exclusively supported by the Getech Group through its wholly owned subsidiary ERCL. ERCL and the Petroleum Directorate have been working together since 2016 providing data required to review Sierra Leone’s proven prospectivity.                       Source: http://www.offshoreenergytoday.com/tag/sierra-leone/

Table 3.6 Sierra Leone Petroleum Licensing Update

Block No. No. of Applications Awarded to Groups/Company Awarded Acreage (km2)           Status as at Dec. 2016
SL- 03 European Hydrocarbons April 2010 1930 1st Ext.
SL-4B-10 Talisman, Prontina Licensed before 2012 Round Relinquished
SL-5-11 LukOil 49%, Oranto 30%, Pan Atlantic 21% June 2011 4022 km2 Relinquished
SL 4A-10 16 African Petroleum, KOSMOS Energy 2012 1995 km2
SL 7A-10 12 Elinilto Ltd: Signet Petroleum, Minexco 2012 3490 km2
SL 7C-10 4 Maters Energy 2012
SL 8A-10 13 Chevron Sahara, Noble Energy, ODYE 2012
SL 8B-10 10 Chevron Sahara, Noble Energy, ODYE 2012
SL 9A-10 2 GNBH Exploration 2012
SL 9B-10 1 GNBH Exploration 2012
SL 10B-10 1 Varada Petroleum and Hydrocarbons 2012
SL 10A-10
SL-7B-11 Anardarko/Repsol/Tullow Oil Licensed Before 2012 Round Relinquished
  Young Energy Prize

Source: Petroleum Directorate/ Compilation by Boas

Oil Discovery in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone does not have any producing fields, but recent exploration activities have confirmed a working petroleum system generating high-quality oil.

Venus discovery

 

The first oil discovery was made in 2009 on a license operated by US operator Anadarko Petroleum. The Venus exploration well was drilled to around 5,600 m total depth in about 1,800 m of water, encountering a pay zone of 45 net feet.

Mercury discovery

 

Also on the SL6/07 block, Anadarko and its partners made a second deepwater discvoery with the Mercury-1 well. Both Venus and Mercury were drilled in the Albian in water depths of 1,600 m or more.

 

Jupiter discovery

 

The Jupiter-1 well, drilled to a total depth of just under 6,500 m, was Sierra Leone’s third deep-

water discovery. Anadarko (operator, 55%) and partners Repsol and Tullow Oil made the discovery in 2012 in the SL-07B-11 block, encountering 30 meters of net pay in the Upper Cretaceous target area.

 

Savannah discovery

 

Sierra Leone’s most recent discovery was made by operator Lukoil and its partners Oranto and Vanco on the SL-05B-11 deepwater block. The Savannah-1x well revealed 3 m net pay of light oil at 4,741 m total depth.

 

In total, eight wells have been drilled, of which six were spudded between 2009 and 2013, with four dis-coveries made. There is 15,780 line km of 2D seismic available from surveys in 2001 and 2013, and 9,976 square km of 3D data from 2003 and 2011.

3.4.6 Major Companies in the Oil and Gas Industry – 2016

Licence Overview

 

In Sierra Leone, African Petroleum holds a 100% operated working interest in offshore

licences SL-03 and SL-4A-10. African Petroleum was awarded a 100% interest in SL-03 in April 2010, while licence SL-4A-10 was awarded as part of Sierra Leone’s third offshore licencing round in 2012. Licences cover a combined net acreage of 3,925km2.

 

In November 2016, the Company signed an agreement with the Sierra Leone government

to enter into the first extension period of the SL-4A-10 licence .

The SL-03 licence is currently in the first extension period which ended on 23 April 2017.

 

Licence Activity

 

Since gaining operatorship of the Sierra Leone Licences, African Petroleum has acquired

approximately 2,500km2 of 3D seismic data over block SL-03 and approximately 1,000km2

of 3D seismic data over block SL-4A-10 (acquired in September 2014).

 

The Company has already identified a number of key prospects in its Sierra Leone Licences, which have net unrisked mean prospective oil resources of 1,354MMStb.

 

Substantial Shareholdings

 

As at 31 March 2017, African Petroleum has the following substantial holdings in its ordinary share capital:

 

Table 3.7 African Petroleum Shareholdings

Shareholder % of Issued Capital
Sarella Investment Ltd 21.4
M & G Investment Management 14.9
Capital Research Global Investors 5.5
Telinet Energi AS 5

 

Licence Amendments

 

On 24 November 2016 African Petroleum reached agreement with the Government of Sierra Leone to proceed into the First Extension Period of the SL-4A-10 licence and to modify the work programme, minimum expenditure requirements and social obligations.

 

It is estimates that the net unrisked mean prospective oil resources is at 1,354MMStb.

 

However, the Petroleum Directorate has continued to invoice the African Petroleum Group based on the rates under the PSC for a first extension term. The African Petroleum Group with operations in Sierra Leone are listed below:

 

Table 3.8   African Petroleum group in Sierra Leone

Entity Name Country of Incorporation Ownership Country of Operation Employees
African Petroleum Sierra Leone Ltd Cayman Island 100% Sierra Leone 0
African Petroleum (SL) Ltd Sierra Leone 99.99% Sierra Leone 10
European Hydrocarbons (SL) Ltd Sierra Leone 99.99% Sierra Leone 0
European Hydrocarbons Ltd United Kingdom 100% Sierra Leone 0

 

 

CONTRACTS

 

Mining

 

The Government of Sierra Leone has signed the following large-scale mining license agreements:

 

Licence Relinquishment

Notification of the acceptance of 2 exploration lease relinquishments and partial relinquishments to 12 of the remaining 15 leases belonging to the Marampa Iron Ore Project was communicated to Cape Lambert Resources Ltd in 2016 from the Ministry of Mining and Mineral Resources (MMMR). These relinquishments reduce its tenement holding to 15 exploration licences (previously 17) with an associated reduction in area from 2,386 square kilometres to 1,688 square kilometres. Source: Company Annual Report

 

Efficiency

The online repository which acts as a mirror of the Mining Cadastre Administrative System (MCAS) was designed originally to be used as a platform for publishing both tax and non-tax data. However, to date, only non-tax data (XML files from MCAS) is being directly uploaded on to the repository.

 

The Geological Information Management System (GIMS), is up and running with an online portal (https://gims.nma.gov.sl/) but the online version currently contains virtually no geological data.

 

Local Content Agency

The Agency promotes Sierra Leone local content development by effectively managing the administration and regulation of Sierra Leone local content development.

3.5 CONTRACT DISCLOSURE

.

In spite of the above the NMA has on its website thirteen contracts including Environmental Impact Assessments and model contract, publicly displayed.

 These are:
1. African Minerals Limited, Environmental Impact Assessment, 2010
 

2. London Mining Company Limited, Concession, 2012

 

3. Model Contract, Concession, 2012

 

4. African Minerals Limited, Tonkolili, Concession, 2010

 

5. Koidu Holdings SA, Concession, 2010

 

6. Sierra Minerals Holdings 1, 28N Gria Zone, Environmental Impact Assessment, 2012

 

7. Tonguma Limited, Tonguma, Environmental Impact Assessment, 2014

 

8. Sierra Rutile Limited, Concession, 2002

 

9. Tonguma Limited, Tonguma, Concession, 2012

10. Sierra Rutile Limited, SRL Acquisition No. 3 Limited, Concession, Amendment, 2004
 

11. London Mining Company Limited, Environmental Impact Assessment, 2012

 

12. Sierra Minerals Holdings 1, 28N Gria Zone, Concession, 2012

 

13.Koidu Holdings SA, Environmental and Social Impact Assessment 2011

 

See, http://www.nma.gov.sl/resourcecontracts/search?q=&order=asc&sortby=contract_name

3.6 BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP

 

In compliance with the requirement on Beneficial Ownership reporting by 2020, Sierra Leone has outlined a roadmap toward the achievement of the goal.

A training workshop was conducted for mining and oil/gas companies in July 2017. A meeting was also held on the 11th August 2017 on the Beneficial Ownership and Disclosure Report published by Alaxandra Reed. The report reviewed the legal framework and the institutional capacity of relevant MDAs to implement the BO requirement.

The Corporate Affairs Commission would serve as focal point for collection of the BO data, liaising with SLEITI in finalising the Corporate Governance Code to ensure its alignment with the global EITI beneficial ownership requirement.

SLEITI would also pursue an amendment to the Companies Act that would cut across all extractive sectors and liaise with the Office of the Chief of Staff in ensuring that beneficial ownership provisions are included in the draft Minerals Policy before submission to Cabinet.

SLEITI will request companies to submit their BO information on templates for 2015-2016 reporting albeit voluntary basis until January 2020. Compliance in the interim will familiarize stakeholders with BO disclosure and afford SLEITI the opportunity to appraise the process and adequately respond to challenges timeously.

3.7 STATE PARTICIPATION IN THE EXTRACTIVE SECTOR

Mining and General Services Ltd (MAGS) which is reported as the only SOE in the mining sector is currently engaged in services such as transportation and mining support including acting as shipping agents and providing clearing and forwarding and travel services. It has no mining interest.

 

African Minerals Ltd has also developed significant port and rail infrastructural support through its subsidiary African Rail and Port Services (SL) Limited in which the Government of Sierra Leone has a 10% free carried interest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.0 EXPLORATION, PRODUCTION AND EXPORTS

 

GEOLOGY

 

Most of the country is underlain by rocks of Precambrian age .The Precambrian (mainly Archaean) outcrops cover about 75% of the country and typically comprises granite-greenstone terrain. Highly folded greenstone belts predominate in the north and central Sierra Leone. In the southeast, the metamorphic facies increases, first with the Kambui Schists and finally with the Mano-Moa Granulites. The Kambui Supergroup includes most of the schist belts exposed in the Sula Mountains and the Kangari, Kambui, Nimini and Gori Hills and the Marampa Group; The greenstone belts are the principal hosts of the gold mineralization of the country.

Other associated mineral deposits include molybdenite, columbite-tantalite and chromite. The Marampa Group, bounded on its eastern margin by a tectonic contact, is important for its iron-ore deposits and forms the upper part of the Kambui Group. Late Liberian granitoids, marginal to, and within, the Kambui Supergroup, are associated with important zones of shearing and deformation where gold, sulphide and molybdenite mineralization has been concentrated.

https://slminerals.org/geography-and-geology/

 

4.1 EXPLORATION UPDATE:

There have been projects acceleration lately for certain commodities such as Gold, Diamond, Bauxite, Rutile and Sand-based minerals due to the influence of the global commodity market price indexes as well as a decline of exploration activities for the same reason (s) for other commodity prices such as Iron Ore.

Here is a summary report of exploration update for the major commodities and companies across Sierra Leone.

 

Synopsis on Diamond Exploration Companies

Stellar Diamonds PLC

 

Stellar Diamonds PLC completed an independent Preliminary Economic Assessment in their resource evaluation work and were able to define a Joint Ore Reporting Code (JORC) from deeper mining and other kimberlite bodies within their concession. The deposits have been extensively explored over the years that delivered robust economic justification for the application of a mining license.

 

Meya Mining

Based on satellite imagery on previous exploration work, a number of targets were generated and a diamond drill programme was initiated across a 9km delineated kimberlite dyke. Drilling later corresponded with an infill drilling programme to confirm the consistency and the geology at depth. A 50 ton/hour processing plant was commissioned to enhance advance exploration and mine development processes such as bulk sampling, pitting and pre mining activities to pave way for a Preliminary Economic Assessment in their resource evaluation process. Dispatch of Meya samples with noncommercial values were sent to external laboratories for kimberlite indicator minerals, sorting and analysis.

 

Seawright Mining Company

Exploration activities were based on historic data and targets generation. Principal focus was to explore for alluvial possibilities that oversaw exploration activities such as pitting, mapping, terrace mapping and drilling. In addition, Seawright Mining Company contracted a privately owned Geophysical Consulting Services to enhance the acceleration of exploration strategies that generated new targets demonstrating the existence of obvious targets for potential resource expansion at depth. A number of diamond drill holes have been planned. Sea Wright continues to be indebted by the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the affected communities by paying of dues to land owning families.

 

Mourne Mining

This is a startup project with exploration based on previous exploration work in the area.  Exploration activities is focusing at the initial phase such as desktop studies, camp construction and equipment mobilization.

Limitations in the Diamond Industry

  • Funding difficulties as bigger players strive cautiously on spending (Lack of exploration means fewer prospects and therefore fewer new exploration sites)
  • The diamond market has some turbulence over the last 24 months, although prices have remained significantly more robust than for most other commodities.

Synopsis on Gold and Base Metal Exploration Companies

Ferensola and Iron Ore (Blue Horizon SL Limited)

During the last two years, the company contracted a drilling contractor and were able to fund and drilled in excess of 9,000m of oriented diamond drill core on their licence along with geological logging, core sampling and assaying of the results. The company also conducted and completed a soil sampling programme across the licence area over the last two years. Additional desktop studies, geological information and drilling data is required to further understand the complexity better than previously thought of the Archean Greenstone terrane.  Source: NMA

Algom Resources Limited

Recommenced exploration activities after taking over the mining lease from Cluff Gold PLC that failed to honor its statutory obligation as per provisions of the Mines and Minerals Act 2009 and its related regulations. Exploration recommenced with the re-establishment of the camping infrastruction and start up, accessing, retrieval and review of historic data. Re-logging of previously drilled holes have been completed to date and interpolation of results to compare with previous drillhole data.  Survey lines for the conduction of a ground magnetic survey have been completed. Comparism of 2017 grade envelopes with previous wireframes as against the previously acquired wireframe.

Nimini Mining Company

The area was laid open to years of exploration that oversaw;

  • Independent potentially mineable Mineral Resource Estimate as at June 2013 (“June 2013 MRE”), based on a minimum true width.
  • June 2013 MRE represented a 21% increase in Indicated Mineral Resources
  • June 2013 MRE has enable the Preliminary Economic Assessment (PEA) to be progressed.
  • Field programmes have identified targets both proximal to the Komahun deposit and within the greater Mining Licence area for future drilling to add to mineral resources
  • Currently undergoing care and maintenance. Source:NMA

 

Synopsis on Sand Based Minerals (Rutile, Zircon, Coltan)

Apart from the expansion towards Sembehun of the existing Rutile Mine in the south, no new application for rutile exploration by other companies lately.  Zircon and Coltan are predominantly limited to small scale and artisanal.

 

Synopsis on Bauxite

 

Sierra Minerals Holdings 1

 

The existing bauxite mine is Sierra Minerals Holdings 1 which has a resource base and are focusing on vertical integration mechanism by securing all raw materials necessary for the entire production chain through expanded exploration in the north of their concession.  Extensive exploration involving drilling, pitting and geological mapping continues north of the current mining lease with the aim to further develop the resource base.

 

Sierramin Bauxite

 

  • Three exploration licenses that was granted 9 December 2014
  • Initial term 4 years, extendable for an additional 2 years and have reached JORC in October 2015
  • Confers exclusive right to apply for conversion to mining lease
  • Deposit typically covered by 1m overburden and reaches average depth of 10m (6-15m) before hitting bed-rock
  • Mineral occurrences as series of blocks across the area typically on topographic highs

 

Other Bauxite Exploration Companies

 

Other companies focusing on bauxite exploration have been granted exploration license and have since commenced initial exploration work on their concession.

Source: NMA.

 

 

COMMERCIAL CONSIDERATIONS IN THE EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY

  1. West African Minerals Corporation completed the sale of its entire interest (5licenses) in the share capital of its wholly owned subsidiary Ferrous Africa Ltd. The buyer Sierra Resources Ltd will thereafter be responsible for any liabilities including rehabilitation and wind-up costs.
  2. Shandong Iron and Steel Ltd acquired the remaining 75% stake of the Tonkolili Iron Ore mine from African Minerals on 21st April 2015 for US$170M. It now owns 100% equity in Tonkolili Mine.
  3. Golden Saint Resources Ltd renewed its license for the Ferensola Gold Project in May 2016
  4. ERCL, a Geotech Group has been working with the Petroleum Directorate since 2016 providing a long term counterpart training program in Freetown with the funding from World Bank EITAP Program. Source: geotech.com

 

Table 4.1: Mineral Reserves in some selected Concessions

Mineral Commodity Operator/Mine Reported Reserves Annual Production Remarks                  
Bauxite Sierra  Minerals Ltd 31Mtons. 53% Aluminium oxide 1.18Mtons SML contains a resource base of approximately 31 million tonnes of bauxite and currently produces around 1.2 million tonnes per annum for export.
Iron Ore Cape Lambert Resources Ltd 680Mtons at 28%Fe 3Mtons
Iron Ore Shangdong Iron & Steel 12.8Billion tons/at 11.5Billioin tons of magnetite oxide 15 Mtons
Rutile/Ilmenite Sierra Rutile/Iluka 895 Mtons of Ore 115Mtons  

Contain tons(kt)
Rutile Ilmenite Zircon
8397 763.4 399.9
Diamonds OCTEA(Koidu)/Stellar Diamonds K1 2.9Mt contain 2M carats. K2 1.3Mt containing 0.3M carats 500,000 carats

Source: Company Reports

4.2 PRODUCTION

Table 4.2 shows minerals produced and exported in Sierra Leone in 2015. Mineral export went down to US$ 358,863,680.68, from US$1,109,239,334.77 in 2014. Activity in the mining sector slumped by 83.7 percent in 2015. This was attributable, in part, to the decline in global iron ore prices and the closure of the domestic iron ore mining companies.

Source: https://www.bsl.gov.sl

 

 

Table 4.2:  Mineral Production and Exports in 2015

MINERAL TYPE PRODUCTION QUANTITY UNIT PRODUCTION[3] VALUE(US$) EXPORT QUANTITY UNIT SALES VALUE (US$)
Iron Ore 768,327.00 wmt 26,471,562.01 1,390,768.00 Wmt 47,916,839.26
Iron Ore 0.00 dmt 0.00 351,009.00 Dmt 6,469,166.53
Diamonds 299,622.79 carats 74,857,913.72 294,863.19 Carats 73,668,772.78
Rutile 126,021.00 dmt 98,212,872.47 116,870.59 Dmt 91,081,618.51
Ilmenite 37,634.00 dmt 5,271,995.15 37,809.33 dmt 5,296,556.42
Zircon 1,389.00 dmt 694,500.00 2,545.00 dmt 1,272,500.00
Bauxite

 

 

1,475,786.08 wmt 48,191,938.34 1,321,691.78 wmt 43,159,973.95
 

ARTISANAL MINING

Diamonds N/A carats 0.00 205,176.20 carats 80,651,180.81
Gold N/A grams 0.00 107,613.91 grams 3,694,705.22
Tantalum N/A kg 0.00 517,510.00 kg 2,956,687.20
Zircon N/A DMT 0.00 104.00 DMT 2,695,680.00
      253,700,781.70     358,863,680.68

Source: NMA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig 4.1: Comparison of export values in 2014 and 2015

4.2.1 Production Status of Major Mining Operations

CAPE LAMBERT RESOURCES

 

Timis Mining Corporation Royalty

 

Cape Lambert will receive a royalty of US$2 per tonne of iron concentrate (Royalty) exported from the Timis Marampa Iron Ore Mine (Mine), which is payable on a quarterly basis on production of 24mt from the Mine. There has been no developments as the end of December 2016

 

Timis Mining Corporation Bridging Finance

 

The Company provided Bridging finance of US$8 million to Timis Mining which was repayable to the Company in October 2015 and incurs interest of 3 month US LIBOR (London interbank offered rate) + 6%. The principal and interest was due to be repaid to Cape Lambert in one

payment on 21 October 2015.

.

In May 2017, the Company announced that it had brought legal action in the High Court of Sierra Leone seeking damages and injunctions which had been granted.

 

Subsequently, the Company announced that the High Court of Sierra Leone issued a Court Order in relation to the Notice of Motion lodged which ordered the Parties to proceed to Arbitration if desired. The Company is presently in discussions with the Defendants in regards to proceeding to Arbitration.

MARAMPA IRON ORE PROJECTS

 

Marampa (100% interest)  is an iron ore project at the development stage, and is located 90 km northeast of Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa

 

Marampa comprises one granted mining licence (ML05/2014) covering 79.40km2 and one granted exploration licence EL46A/2011 covering 159.78km2 which is held by Marampa Iron Ore (SL) Limited, an indirectly subsidiary of Cape Lambert.

 

The Marampa Project remains under care and maintenance.

 

The status the various iron ore tenements belonging to Marampa Iron Ore and Tonkolili Project are listed below:

Table 4.3: Iron tenements of Marampa

Tenement Reference Company Project Location Commodity Interest at Dec. 2017 Activity Status
Marampa Project- EL 46A/2011 Cape Lambert Resources Lunsar, Iron Ore 100% Care & Maintenance
Marampa Project- ML 05/2014 Cape Lambert Resources Lunsar, Iron Ore 100% Care & Maintenance
Marampa Project –EL 22/2012 Cape Lambert Resources Kukuna, Iron Ore 100% Care & Maintenance
Tonkolili Iron Ore
 

 

COMPOSITION OF NATIONAL EXPORTS

Minerals continue to feature prominently in the country’s export commodities in 2015

The value of EI exports as a whole decreased to US$ 536.2 in 2015 from US$1.25bn in 2014. (See Table 4.6)

Table 4.4: Total National Export (2012-2016)

Year Minerals Coffee Cocoa Piassava Fish Others Domestic Export Re-Exports Total Exports
2012 721,612 3,845 22520 17488 197686 963,154.8 40,646.3 1,003,801.2
2013 1401066 2,815 8964 15.0 316 104831 1502382.4 24,657.3 1,527,039.7
2014 1093995 2752 25684 1231 70524 1194187 61892.8 1,256,080.8
2015 376234 1346 19148 4163 110802 511,694.4 24,519.4 536,213.8
                 

Source: Bank of Sierra Leone

 

Tribute Mining Agreement Signed over Tongo-Tonguma, Sierra Leone

Stellar Diamonds plc, the London quoted diamond exploration and development company announced that it has signed a legally binding conditional Tribute Mining Agreement and Revenue Share Agreement with Octea Mining Limited in respect of the Tongo-Tonguma kimberlite diamond project in eastern Sierra Leone.

10% share of gross revenues (after deduction of Government royalty) payable to Octea on diamond and other minerals recovered and sold, once Stellar has recouped an amount equal to its CAPEX investment and Octea has received an initial revenue share payment of US$5 million

Stellar is to make a one-off payment of US$5.5 million to Octea five years after Project mine development commences.  On completion, Stellar will acquire a 50tph kimberlite processing plant from Octea for a nominal amount in order to fast track production. Stellar’s has invested US$7.2 million to date on establishing resources at Tongo.

Stellar Diamonds signed the Tribute Mining Agreement and Revenue Share Agreement on 27 April 2017. On Completion, Octea will continue to hold the Tonguma mining licence through its subsidiary company Tonguma Ltd (the legal holder of the Tonguma licence) and Stellar will continue to wholly own its adjacent Tongo licence and subsidiary company Sierra Diamonds Limited. Stellar will also own certain infrastructure and capital items procured and utilised for the mine development on both licences.

Octea has agreed that for so long as the Tribute Mining Agreement is in place, it will not sell Tonguma Ltd or the Tonguma licence to a third party.

 

ILUKA- SIERRA RUTILE MERGER

Iluka Resources Limited (Iluka) has advised that following German regulatory approval on 22 November 2016 and the Merger Update announcement of 7 December 2016, it has completed the acquisition of Sierra Rutile Limited (SRL) by means of a statutory merger of SRL with Iluka Investments Limited (BVI), a wholly owned Iluka subsidiary.

The total transaction cost of A$393 million, includes the final consideration for SRL equity of A$375 million (£215 million) and A$18 million of transaction costs. Payment was made on 7 December 2016. Iluka has assumed SRL’s net debt of approximately US$59 million, (A$80 million).

TONKOLILI IRON ORE MINE RESTART

By May 2015, Shandong Steel and Iron Group (SISG) had increased their stakes to 100% . An opening ceremony was launched on 6th May 2015 for the Tonkolili project with the new enterprise driver SISG.

According to the Director of Mines, Shandong Iron and Steel Group (SISG) resumed operations at the Tonkolili Iron Ore Project and began shipment of iron ore in February 2016.

Government loan

The European Union (EU), in August 2004, gave a grant of $25 million dollars to the Government of Sierra Leone which was passed on to Sierra Rutile as government’s contribution to the start-up capital of the company after the civil war; a move to boost economic growth. [4]

In December 2014, the Group obtained a temporary deferral, with final approval being granted in January 2015, for an eighteen month deferral of repayments of principal and payment of interest in respect of the loan payable to the Government. During the deferral period, interest continues to accrue and is capitalized into the principal loan balance. On 18 March 2016, a further six month deferral was agreed with the Government such that the next repayment due under this loan was in December 2016.

The balance outstanding as at 31 December 2015 was $22.1 million (2014: $22.9 million). No principal or interest payments were made in 2015. The loan carries a fixed interest rate of 8.0%. An amount of 22million Euros representing the full liability was paid to the government in November 2016.

5.0 REVENUE COLLECTION

  5.1 REVENUE FLOW

     5.1.1 MINING

A.

  1. i) Revenues collected in the mining sector are from large and small scale mining operations (See Tables 5.1&5.2). These are non-tax and tax revenues.
  2. ii) The revenues are from the exploration and production phases of the mining chain. Indirect taxes include PAYE and withholding taxes. These were excluded from the revenues considered for reconciliation. This is because of the fact that technically those payments are not made by the reporting entities, but are made on behalf of employees and other entities.

iii) The non- tax revenues include exploration and mining licences and mineral royalty. Mining entities engaged in exploration and mining activities pay exploration and mining licences respectively. Mineral royalty is paid by entities engaged in the production of minerals. Companies producing minerals also pay corporate income tax on profits declared annually. Exploration/ Mining licences, royalty and corporate income tax are collected by the NRA.

  1. iv) In addition to the above, large scale mining lease holders also pay surface rentals to district councils, Paramount Chiefs/ Chiefdom Administration, Constituency Development Fund and individuals with surface rights within their areas of operation.

Surface rent is paid in accordance with part 5, section 34 of the Mining and Minerals Act 2009. Surface rents are negotiated between the companies and the communities.

  1. v) The holder of a small-scale or large scale mining licence shall assist in the development of mining communities affected by its operations to promote sustainable development, enhance the general welfare and the quality of life of the inhabitants, and shall recognize and respect rights, customs, traditions and religion of local communities(MMA,2009) . This is to be achieved through community development agreements.

Holders of small or large scale mining licence shall expend in every year that the community development agreement is in force, no less than one percent of one percent of the gross revenue amount earned by the mining operations in the previous year to implement the agreement, and such amount and breakdown of expenditures shall be reported to the Minister annually as may be prescribed. (Section 139(4); MMA, 2009).  The holder of a small-scale or large scale mining licence is required to have and implement a community development agreement with the primary host community if its approved mining operation will or does exceed any of the following limits:

  1. In the case of extraction of minerals from primary alluvial deposits, where annual throughput is more than one million cubic metres per year;
  2. In the case of underground mining operations, where annual combined run-of-mine ore and waste production is more than one hundred thousand tonnes per year(waste material not exiting mine mouth to be excluded)
  3. In the case of open-cast mining operations extracting minerals from primarily non-alluvial deposits, where annual combined run-of –mine ore, rock, waste and overburden production is more than two hundred and fifty thousand tonnes per year; or
  4. Where the licence holder employs or contracts more than one hundred employees or workers at the same mine site on a typical working day (including all shifts).

 

  1. The community development Fund replaced the agriculture development fund. Only Sierra Rutile Ltd had arrangements involving the agriculture development fund and made payments towards the fund.

               

  1. vi) Environmental Payments

 

The Environmental Protection Agency also collects payments for environmental Impact Assessment licencing fees and environmental Impact Assessment monitoring fee from extractive companies seeking and holding mining leases.             

 

  1. Revenues from small scale Gold /Diamond and Koidu Ltd

 

The Precious Minerals Trading (PMT) undertakes valuation and certification of gold and diamond for export and arranges the collection of taxes levied on them.

Export licence holders who trade with small scale gold and diamond producers do not pay royalty, but pay export duty. The duty is currently pegged at 3% of valued diamond and 5% of gold sales.

Valuation of diamonds from the large scale producer, Koidu (OCTEA) is handled by PMT but arranges the payment of corresponding royalty to NRA.

Licensed gold and diamond traders and their accredited agents pay license fees. Fee assessment is made by the National Minerals Agency (NMA) but payment is made to the NRA.


Table 5.1 Revenue Streams

 Revenue stream Description/Details
Exploration

Licence

Exploration licence fee is area based and is US$100/sq. km for the first 4 years. Beyond, the fee

Is US$400/ sq. km for the first 125km2 , with anything in excess of 125km2 attracting a fee of

US$800/sq. km. Payment is made annually.

Mining Licence

 

Fees paid annually by holders of mining lease in accordance with section 152 of the Mining and

Minerals Act 2009. Small scale mining licence is granted for an initial period of 3 years. The large

Scale mining licence is granted for a period of 25 years.

Royalty Mineral royalty is a production based tax which is levied on the basis of section 148 of the Mines and Minerals Act 2009. Thus the holder of a mineral right shall pay to the government royalty in respect of any mineral obtained by him pursuant to his mineral right.

Royalty payable is a percentage of the market value of mineral.

The royalty payable applicable is as follows:

a)      15% for special stones defined as those stones whose market value is above five hundred thousand United States dollars.

(Amended in the Finance Act, 2015 from 15% to 3%).

 

b)  6.5% for precious stones obtained under a large scale or small scale mining license and 3% for precious stones obtained under artisanal mining licence.

c)     5% for precious metals obtained under a large scale or small scale mining license and 3% for precious metal obtained in artisanal mining

d)   3% for all other minerals

Corporate tax This is tax on profit paid by entities in the extractive industry. The income tax rate applying to mining companies is 30%. It is levied in accordance with the provisions of the Income Tax Act 2000.

The capital allowance regime provides for first year allowance of 40% on qualifying assets, and 20%   for each succeeding year for the next three years.

Losses made in the current year shall be set off against profits of the succeeding year

Diamond Exporter’s Licence fee This is the annual fees paid by licenced exporters of diamonds
Diamond Export Duty Tax paid on the export of diamonds by licence holders. The rate is 3% on the value of diamond to be exported
Surface Rental Surface rent is paid in accordance with part 5, section 34 of the Mining and Minerals Act 2009.This is paid only by entities with mining licence. Surface rents are negotiated between the companies and the communities. There are basically three modes of payments.

a) Companies pay the total amount to the District council, which in turn give a portion to the relevant Chiefdom Councils.

b) The company pays surface rent to the Chiefdom Administration, which pays part to the District Council.

c) The company pays directly to district councils, chiefdom councils and individual landowners according to the formula prescribed by part 5 section 34 of the MMA, 2009.

The basis of payment may either be on per km2 basis or a lump sum per annum.

Formula for distribution:

50% – Land owners

15%Paramount chief.

15% – District Council

10% – Chiefdom Council

10% – Constituency development.

 

Environmental Licence

 

Licence obtained after conducting Environmental impact studies. It is a pre-requisite for obtaining mining licence. Its payment is based on the Environmental Protection Act 2008.

 

Environmental Monitoring Fee Amount levied to enable the EPA to ensure compliance with the environmental impact study.
Agriculture Development Fund Amount paid by Mining companies for agricultural development activities in their catchment areas
Community Development Fund Amount paid by companies to assist in the development of communities affected by mining. Replaced the agricultural development fund. Paid in accordance with section139 of MMA 2009. Amount is 1% of gross income of companies

 

5.1.2 Oil/Gas

Revenues from the Oil/Gas sector include;

  • Training fund,
  • Surface rental
  • Technology Bonus
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Licence
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees
  • Signature Bonus
  • Extension fees
  • Sale of geophysical data

 

The revenue flows within the extractive sector in Sierra Leone at the time of the scoping study are indicated below

Table 5.2: Revenue flow during Scoping study

Revenue Stream Extractive Industry Frequency of Payment Agency Responsible for collection Application of payment.
Exploration License Mining Annual NRA Consolidated Fund
 Mining License Mining Annual NRA Consolidated Fund
Surface Rent Mining Annual Chiefdom/District Council Disbursed according to formula.
Royalty Large Scale Mining Depends on Agreement. NRA Consolidated Fund
Royalty Small scale Mining When Minerals sold NRA Consolidated Fund
Corporate tax Mining Annual(Depends on contract) NRA Consolidated Fund
Payroll  tax Mining Annual NRA Consolidated Fund
Import duty Mining/Petroleum As and when NRA Consolidated Fund
PAYE Mining/Petroleum Monthly NRA Consolidated Fund
Withholding  Taxes Mining As and when NRA Consolidated Fund
Agricultural Development Fund  

Mining

 

Annual

 

MMMR

Mining Community for Agriculture Development
Community Development Fund Mining Annual MMMR Development of affected Mining communities
Diamond Exporter’s license Mining Exports Annual NRA Consolidated Fund
Diamond Dealers Licence Mining Exports Annual NRA Consolidated Fund
Gold Exporters Licence Mining Exports Annual NRA Consolidated Fund
Gold dealers licence        
 Export Duty on Diamonds Mining Exports On export PMT/MMMR Disbursed according to formula
Export duty on gold Mining Exports On export PMT/MMMR Disbursed according to formula
 

Training fees

Petroleum Annual Petroleum Directorate Petroleum Directorate
Surface Rental Petroleum Annual Petroleum Directorate Consolidated Fund
Extension Fees Petroleum When required Petroleum Directorate Consolidated Fund
Sale of geophysical data Petroleum Upon request Petroleum Directorate Consolidated Fund

             Source: MOFED/Gov’t Agencies

 

SCOPING STUDY

The Independent Administrator carried out the scoping study to determine the following:

  1. a) The payments and revenue streams existing in the extractive sector in Sierra Leone, providing an outline of the payment flows within the industry. (See Table 5.2 above)

 

b). A well-defined scope or reporting parameters for the 2015/16 SLEITI Reconciliation exercise including options for establishing a materiality threshold.  Also, a minimum materiality threshold for not pursuing further investigation of discrepancies was recommended.

c). The Reporting entities and the determination of other requisite parameters for the 2015/16 SLEITI report.

Total payment of US$20,955,514.71 and US$26,403,529.21 were documented as mining related receipts by government in 2015 and 2016 respectively.[5] (See. Revenue streams used in establishing materiality thresholds  Appendix. 3)

 

The Independent Administrator presented threshold analysis and provided three materiality thresholds each for 2015 and 2016 for the MSG to select the appropriate ones.

 

The MSG opted for reporting threshold of US$170,000 for 2015 and 2016 of relevant payments for the mining sector.

 

SCOPING OUTCOMES

MSG decisions regarding scope (see Table….) for the 2015/16 SLEITI Report were based on extensive analysis report presented by the IA in November 2017. MSG has communicated their agreement on certain issues regarding scope and materiality for the 2015/16 SLEITI report contained in e-mails dated November 15, 2017.

The MSG’s final relevant scoping decisions have been summarized in the following sections.

Table 5.3:Scoping parameters for 2015/16 SLEITI Report

Parameter                                                        Decision
  2015    2016
Materiality Threshold for Mining US$170,000 US$170,000
Number of In Scope companies (Mining) 12 12
Coverage of selected companies payments

to total preliminary receipts

88% 89%
Number of In Scope companies(Oil and Gas) 0 0

 

Materiality statement and Reporting Entities:

All mining entities and diamond exporters that made minimum relevant payments of US$170,000 in 2015  were required to complete a template for the 2015/16 SLEITI report. (See Table 5.4). The selected mining entities are shown in Table … below.

 

Table 5.4 Selected mining companies for 2015 SLEITI report

No. TIN Name of extractive Company Mineral Activity
1 1001358-5 KOIDU LTD. DIAMOND PRODUCTION
2 1000672-9 SIERRA RUTILE RUTILE PRODUCTION
3 TIMIS MINING IRON ORE
4 1000672-9 SIERRA MINERALS HOLDINGS LTD BAUXITE PRODUCTION
5 1000351-9 H. M. DIAMONDS DIAMOND EXPORTER
6 TONKOLILI IRON(ORE)SL IRON ORE PRODUCTION
7 S.D STEEL(SL) LTD IRON ORE PRODUCTION
8 AFRICAN RAILS AND PORTS IRON ORE
9 1025212-6 KASSIM BASMA DIAMOND EXPORTER
10 AMARA MINING SL LIMITED -BAOMAHUN GOLD  LIMITED GOLD DEVELOPMENT
11 AMR GOLD SL LTD IRO WILKINSON  HILL MINING
12 1020041-5 SHAWKE B SHOUR DIAMOND EXPORTER

 

 

 

Revenue Streams

Mining Sector

Mining sector revenue streams approved by the MSG for inclusion in the 2015/16 SLEITI report are indicated below: (See Tables 5.1 and 5.2)

  • Mining Licence
  • Exploration Licence
  • Mineral Royalty
  • Corporate tax
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Licence
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring fee.
  • Export duty on diamonds
  • Diamond Exporter’s licence fees.
  • Surface Rent
  • Agricultural Development Fund
  • Community Development Fund
  • Constituency Development Fund

 

Table 5.5 Revenue Streams and receiving Government Agencies

BENEFIT STREAM NRA MMMR NMA EPA DISTRICT/ CHIEFDOM COUNCILS MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
Royalty ü             
Mining Licence ü             
Exploration Licence ü             
Corporate Tax ü             
Environmental Assessment Monitoring fee       ü       
Environmental Assessment Licence       ü       
Export Duty on Diamonds     ü         
Diamond Exporter’s Licence ü             
Surface Rental         ü     
Community Development Fund   ü           
Agricultural Development Fund   ü           
Constituency Development Fund           ü   

 All the above revenue streams from the mining sector were to be reconciled in the 2015 SLEITI report.

 Additionally the reporting extractive entities and the NRA shall also report on PAYE, payroll tax and import duties paid in 2015 and 2016. These would however not be included in the reconciliation exercise for the 2015 EITI report. 

Government reporting entities

The MSG determined that all government agencies that receive extractive-related revenues from companies above the materiality threshold are in-scope and their revenues were included for reporting and reconciliation. Based on these criteria, the following government entities were identified as in-scope for the 2015 SLEITI report:

 

The National Revenue Authority (NRA), Environmental Protection Agency, Precious Minerals Trading (GGDO), National Minerals Agency (NMA), Ministry of Mines and Mineral Resources (MMMR), District and Chiefdom Councils and members of Parliament.(see Table 5.4)

OIL/GAS

 

According to the Petroleum Directorate no revenue was received in 2015 and 2016. Thus the following revenue streams were not reconciled in the 2015 report.

 

  • Training fund,
  • Surface rental
  • Technology Bonus
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Licence
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees
  • Signature Bonus
  • Extension fees
  • Sale of geophysical data

 

The Oil/Gas companies were not operational in those years

 

5.4 REPORTING COMPANIES AND EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY ENTITIES

Twelve companies/extractive entities met the materiality threshold in 2015 and 2016 respectively. These entities are indicated in Appendices 2 & 4. Entities that did not meet the materiality threshold and therefore considered out of scope of reconciliation are shown in Appendices 3 and 5 for 2015 and 2016 respectively.

 

5.5 DISCREPANCY

 

For the purpose of the reconciliation, the reporting entities were required to provide justification for any discrepancy between individual financial flows exceeding 1% of the total revenue. Furthermore, the reconciliation exercise of material payments should be concluded when the discrepancy is less than 1% of the total reported government revenues.

 

DATA QUALITY

ASSURANCES PROVIDED BY REPORTING ENTITIES TO THE IA

The MSG decided to include both senior Management endorsement and Auditors certification, to ensure maximum credibility of data.

  • The Financial statements by Government Entities are audited by the Auditor General’s Department. The Auditor Generals’ Department will endorse the templates of government entities.
  • The MSG has decided that templates for extractive companies should be certified by the independent Auditors of these companies.

 

  • In addition to the endorsements by auditors, senior management members will endorse the templates and emboss with company stamp on behalf of the board of directors.

 

  • Templates were to be accompanied by appropriate supporting documents, such as receipts and bank statements.

 

REPORTING TEMPLATES

 

Based on the confirmation of revenue streams and receiving government agencies, Templates have   been designed by the IA. See Appendices 6 and 7

6.0: OTHER REPORTING PARAMETERS

6.1: MANDATORY AND VOLUNTARY SOCIAL EXPENDITURES

The only mandatory direct payment from mining companies to sub-national entities is surface rent. Details of such transactions would be thoroughly checked by the IA and reported on in the 2015/16 Report

This study has not come across voluntary payments associated with training and social contribution from the oil companies.

All mining agreements with Community Development Agreement provisions would be fully reported on in the 2015/16 EITI Report.

6.2: TRANSPORTATION PAYMENTS

No transportation revenues were found in Sierra Leone.

6.3   QUASI-FISCAL EXPENDITURES

Our study of the existing companies in the extractive industry did not find existence of     quasi-fiscal expenditures.

6.5 STATE’S SHARE OF PRODUCTION OR OTHER REVENUES COLLECTED IN-KIND

There was no production share for the state in the mining sector in Sierra Leone in    2015/2016

Government does not own any extractive company where evidence was found that state has received revenues in 2015/16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.0 RECONCILIATION:

 SCOPE OF WORK

Basis of Reporting/Currency

The reporting currency for the assignment is the United States Dollars (US$). The United States dollar (US$) was chosen as it is the predominant currency used in transactions involving the revenue streams.

EXCHANGE RATE:  For translating Leones into US dollars, average exchange rate for the year has been applied. An exchange rate of 1US$: Le 5,000 was applied.

 Auditing

The financial statements of all the participating entities have been audited for 2015 by the independent auditors of the companies employing auditing standards issued by the International Auditing and Assurance Standards board. Government reporting entities had their financial statements audited by the Audit Service of Sierra Leone. The Audit Service of Sierra Leone is a member of  the International Organization of  Supreme Audit Institutions(INTOSAI)and African Organization of Supreme Audit Institutions (AFROSAI) and applies the International Standards of Supreme Audit Institutions (ISSAI) issued by  (INTOSAI) in its auditing work.

 ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN AT RECONCILIATION

 

Data Collection and Analysis

 

Credibility of data

 

In order to assure the credibility of the data in accordance with EITI standard, the MSG agreed that the following should be provided as part of the completed templates by participants.

 

Sign-off from a senior company or government official from each reporting entity attesting that the completed reporting template is a complete and accurate record.

 

  • An endorsement on the template by the companies’ external auditor that confirms that the information they have submitted is comprehensive and consistent with their audited financial statements. However, for Oil and Gas companies that no longer operate in Sierra Leone certification by Senior Officers with the appropriate signatures and official stamps were acceptable without External Auditors certification.

 

  • All the templates should include appropriate supporting documents, such as receipts and bank statements.

 

  • Government reporting entities obtain a certification of the accuracy of the government’s disclosures from the Auditor General.
  • Detailed schedule of payments and supporting documents.

The MSG had the view that the Auditors attestation will ensure the completeness and reliability of the data as they are professionally enjoined to provide true and fair view of financial statements. Again with the provision of supporting documents, the independent Administrator can also have the opportunity to comment on the reliability of the data.

The MSG collected the templates from the reporting entities between 20th October 2017 and 30th November, 2017, however templates from the NRA were submitted later than the cut off date.

Data  reliability check

 

Data collected  was scrutinised to ensure that they fully meet the requirements set out for the completion of templates. As a result data reliability was checked against the following criteria:

  • Completeness:- Templates submitted by participating candidates were checked to ensure that all requisite responses have been thoroughly completed.
  • Relevance:- Attached documentations such as receipts and schedules were checked for their relevance to figures and periods provided on the templates.
  • Correctness/accuracy:- Figures provided in the templates were checked for correctness against receipts or other documentions provided. Also figures on receipts were summed up to ensure they tally with the figures provided in the templates.

To confirm the accuracy and reliability of data the following activities were undertaken.

Surface Rentals

Payments made were checked, to ensure that they were made in accordance with the Minerals and Mining Act, 2009 part 5. (See section 4.6).

Exploration Licence

The exploration licence number was checked, taken specific notice of the type and number of licences. Fees paid was checked and compared with amount payable.

Mining Licence

To check the reliability of the mining licence,checks were made on the on line repository to find out if the reporting company has a mining licence. Secondly the amount paid is checked if it is a mining lease payment as it is bigger than exploration licence fees.

For Royalty; A list of the payments of royalties made in 2015 were obtained from the NRA and NMA.

  • Details of mineral production in 2015 was obtained from the NMA.
  • Production figures were compared to export figures from the Bank of Sierra Leone.
  • Royalty payable was computed based on rate levied(based on contract between the company and GoSL) and the value of production and export as provided by NMA/Bank of Sierra Leone.
  • Computed royalty payable was compared to actual payment indicated on templates and any discrepancy resolved if any.

 

Other checks for reliability were performed for all the remaining revenue streams applying the relevant laws and clauses in contracts between the companies and GoSL.               

Certification:-  Templates were checked to ensure that they have been properly endorsed by completing officers with appropriate signatories and official stamps. Attestation from auditors and the Audit Service of Sierra Leone were checked for reporting companies and government entities respectively.

     

Initial Reconciliation

A database in Microsoft excel was set up for the reporting entities and populated with details from the templates.

Reconciliation was undertaken on company by company basis and at mining lease level.

All discrepancies were identified.

 Investigation of Discrepancies

The following steps were undertaken to investigate discrepancies.

  1. Examination of supporting documents
  2. Clarifications were sought from the reporting entities
  • Amendments to initial amounts provided by the entities were undertaken to obtain final figures.
  1. Final figures are reconciled to obtain the final amounts.

 

7.1 RESULTS OF RECONCILIATION

The results are indicated below:

Completeness, accuracy and reliability of data

In order to ensure the comprehensiveness, accuracy and reliability of data, the Independent Administrator undertook the following activities.

  • Ascertained if the financial statements of the entities participating in the reconciliation exercise have been audited to international standards.(See section.. on Auditing)
  • Reported templates were also checked for completeness, relevance, correctness/accuracy and certification
  • The Independent Administrator however could not evaluate the internal controls within any of the participating companies/government entities, and could therefore not place any reliance on them (internal controls).

Companies

Mining sector

Out of the twelve (12) companies that were required to report four companies, namely Sierra Rutile Ltd, Timis Mining Co. Ltd, Amara Mining (SL) Ltd, AMR Gold Sierra Leone Ltd failed to report.

Timis Mining Co. and Sierra Rutile Ltd are under new management, and the management indicated that they were now studying the books of the companies and were therefore not in the position to report ,in spite of all the efforts by the MSG(including petitioning the MMMR)

Amara Mining (SL) Ltd that operated the Baohuman project/Cluff Mining no longer operates in Sierra Leone.

Tonkolili and African Ports and Services Ltd were all reported under S.D.Steel Ltd as they are subsidiaries of Shandon D. Steel Ltd. Payments were made in the names of the parent company as well as the subsidiaries (See Observation and significant findings)

Oil/Gas: As noted earlier there were no templates received from companies in the Oil/Gas sector. The companies in the sector were not operational in 2015/2016.

Government Agencies: All the government agencies that were required to report did so promptly with the exception of the NRA. As indicated earlier and noted in the observation and significant findings, NRA’s templates were received very late.

 

Unilateral declaration by government agencies

Revenues received by government Agencies from the companies that made payments in 2015 but did not submit templates are shown in Table 7.1 below[6],

Table 7.1: Unilateral declaration

Name of Company                             Government Agency
  NRA EPA   Total
Sierra Rutile Ltd
     4,343,199
264,804

 

4,608,003
Timis Mining Co. Ltd               1,942,499

 

349,272

 

2,291,771
Cluff Mining (Amara Mining Ltd)

 

                  281,240

 

    150,450 431,690
  AMR(GOLD)                     263,896   263,896
Total 6,566,938                     1,028,422     7,595,360

 

 

 


Reconciliation by companies.

Reconciliation of extractive companies and government receipts as presented by companies is shown in table 7.2.below

Table 7.2: Reconciliation by companies

No. Company Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Koidu Ltd          5,620,568        (42,805)      5,577,763         5,601,813                 –     5,601,813          5,577,763        5,601,813        23,186     (47,236)
2 Sierra Rutile Ltd                         –                   –                     –                        –                 –                    –                         –                       –                  –                –
3 Timis Mining Ltd                         –                   –                     –                        –                 –                    –                         –                       –                  –                –
4 Vimetco Sierra Minerals Holding Ltd     2,399,122.67        (87,289)      2,311,834         2,091,990                 –     2,091,990          2,311,834        2,091,990      225,292  (5,448.00)
5 H.M Diamonds     1,773,088.00                   –      1,773,088         1,795,493                 –     1,795,493          1,773,088        1,795,493           1,500     (23,905)
6 S.D STEEL-Tonkolili Iron Ore     1,272,679.00        (15,220)      1,257,459         1,785,008                 –     1,785,008          1,257,459        1,785,008           8,195   (535,744)
7 Kassim M Basma        496,816.00                   –         496,816             496,815                 –        496,815              496,816           496,815                   1                –
9 Cluff-Amara Mining Ltd                         –                   –                     –                        –                 –                    –                         –                       –                  –                –
10 AMR Gold SL LTD                         –                   –                     –                        –                 –                    –                         –                       –                  –                –
11 Shawke B Shour        222,320.19                   –         222,320             222,320                 –        222,320              222,320           222,320                   0                 0
15 Total        11,784,594     (145,314)   11,639,280       11,993,439                 –    11,993,439        11,639,280      11,993,439      258,174   (612,333)

 

 

Reconciliation by Revenue Streams

Reconciliation of Extractive companies payments and government receipts as depicted by revenue streams is shown in Table 7.3 below.

Table 7.3 Reconciliation by Revenue Streams

2015 Company Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 2,030,143 0 2,030,143 2,256,957 0 2,256,957 2,030,143 2,256,957 23,186 -250,000
2 Exploration Licence 43,207 0 43,207 43,207 0 43,207 43,207 43,207 0 0
3 Royalty 6,204,466 0 6,204,466 6,215,251 0 6,215,251 6,204,466 6,215,251 1 -10,786
4 Export duty for Diamonds 2,168,841 0 2,168,841 2,168,844 0 2,168,844 2,168,841 2,168,844 0 -3
5 Corporate Tax 216,883 0 216,883 240,784 0 240,784 216,883 240,784 1 -23,902
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 106,500 0 106,500 105,000 0 105,000 106,500 105,000 1,500 0
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 479,011 0 479,011 739,910 0 739,910 479,011 739,910 7,596 -268,495
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 94,283 0 94,283 153,430 0 153,430 94,283 153,430 0 -59,147
9 Surface Rent 223,565 -145,314 78,251 70,056 0 70,056 78,251 70,056 8,195 0
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11 Community Development Fund 217,695 0        217,695                     –              –                 – 217,695                   –      217,695             –
TOTAL      11,784,594      (145,314)   11,639,280      11,993,439              –    11,993,439 11,639,280    11,993,439      258,174  (612,333)


After the reconciliation, total company receipts amounted to US$ 11,639,280, whilst total government receipts amounted to US$11,993,439.

 

Discrepancy: Discrepancies are labelled as positive if for the same revenue stream, the amount reported by companies exceeds that reported by the government Agencies as receipts. If the amount received by the government Agencies exceeds payment by the companies, the resulting discrepancy is labelled negative.

There was a net discrepancy of US$354,159, and an absolute discrepancy of US$870,507 representing 2.95% and 7.26%  of government receipts respectively.

Due to time constraints the IA could not resolve any discrepancy.

 Extractive entity and discrepancies

The discrepancies and the companies they associated with are shown in below

Table 7.4 Extractive entity and discrepancies

2015 Unresolved discrepancies  
Extractive Entity  Amounts reported by company but not confirmed by Gov’t Agency Amounts reported by government but not by company
Koidu Ltd                                          23,186                           (47,236)
Sierra Rutile Ltd                                                   –                                     –
Timis Mining Ltd                                                   –                                     –
Vimetco Sierra Minerals Holding Ltd                                       225,292                       (5,448.00)
H.M Diamonds                                            1,500                           (23,905)
S.D STEEL-Tinkolili Iron Ore                                            8,195                        (535,744)
Kassim M Basma                                                    1                                     –
Cluff-Amara Mining Ltd                                                   –                                     –
AMR Gold SL LTD                                                   –                                     –
Shawke B Shour                                                    0                                       0
 
Total                                       258,174                        (612,333)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue streams and discrepancies

The discrepancies from the revenue streams perspective are shown below.

Table 7.5 Revenue streams and discrepancies

Unresolved
Revenue Stream Amount by which extractive entity payment exceeded that reported by gov’t  agency Amount by which gov’t entity receipt  exceeded that reported by gov’t  agency
2015
Mining Licence 23,186 -250,000
Exploration Licence 0 0
Royalty 1 -10,786
Export duty for Diamonds 0 -3
Corporate Tax 1 -23,902
Diamond Exporter’s License fee 1,500 0
Environmental Impact Assessment License 7,596 -268,495
Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 0 -59,147
Surface Rent 8,195 0
Agricultural Development Fund 0 0
Community Development Fund                             217,695                                  –
TOTAL                             258,174                             (612,333)

 

Contribution of Revenue streams to government receipts.

 

The contribution of the various revenue streams to the final government receipts obtained after reconciliation is shown below.

 

  Table 7.6: contribution of revenue streams to government receipts

Royalty 6,215,251 52
Mining Licence 2,256,957 19
Export duty for Diamonds 2,168,844 18
Environmental Impact Assessment License 739,910 6
Corporate Tax 240,784 2
Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 153,430 1
Diamond Exporter’s License fee 105,000 1
Surface Rent 70,056 1
Exploration Licence 43,207 0
Agricultural Development Fund 0 0
Community Development Fund 0 0

Contribution of Companies payments to government receipts.

 

The amounts and percentages contributed by extractive companies to royalties obtained at reconciliation are shown below.

 

Table 7.7: Contribution of extractive entities to government receipts

Extractive Entity Amount paid(US$)           Percentage (%)
Koidu Ltd            5,601,813                  46.71
Vimetco Sierra Minerals Holding Ltd            2,091,990                  17.44
H.M Diamonds            1,795,493                  14.97
S.D STEEL-Tinkolili Iron Ore            1,785,008                  14.88
Kassim M Basma                496,815                    4.14
Shawke B Shour                222,320                    1.85
Sierra Rutile Ltd                            –                         –
Timis Mining Ltd                            –                         –
Cluff-Amara Mining Ltd                            –                         –
AMR Gold SL LTD                            –                         –
Total          11,993,439 100

 

Coverage

The coverage of the report is shown in table 7.8 below. It indicates the proportion of t the government receipts in the reconciliation to total receipts.

 

 Table 7.8 coverage of EITI reconciliation

Government collection-EITI Total collection
Mining Licence 2,300,164          5,849,357.29 39
Royalty 6,215,251          9,225,535.47 67
Export duty for Diamonds 2,168,844          2,390,857.32 91
Corporate Tax 240,784              488,205.00 49
Diamond Exporter’s License fee 105,000              204,316.93 51
Environmental Impact Assessment License 739,910          1,595,670.00 46
Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 153,430              319,074.00 48
Surface Rent 70,056   70,056.00 100
Agricultural Development Fund 0                               –
Community Development Fund 0                               –
TOTAL         11,993,439.48        20,143,072.01 60

 

The overall coverage for the report is 60%. Noting that two major producing companies in 2015 with payments in royalty, corporate tax and environment related payments did not participate the coverage is quite good.

 

EFFECT OF COMPANIES/EXTRACTIVE ENTITIES THAT DID NOT PARTICIPATE

 

There were four companies that did not participate in the reconciliation exercise, although they were selected. These companies were Sierra Rutile Ltd, Timis Mining Ltd, Amara Mining/Cluff Mining, AMR Gold Ltd. From unilateral declarations by the government agencies, these companies made payments of US$7,595,360.

 

If these companies had reported and their payments accounted for it would mean the EITI government receipt figures would have been boasted by US$7,595,360.

The total government receipt figure will have remained same at US$20,143,072. The coverage for the report would have increased by (US$ 7,595,360/20,143,072) i.e. 37%. Thus the coverage recorded will increase to 97%.

The exclusion of Timis and Sierra Rutile from the reconciliation, had a significant effect (they accounted for over 91% of the lost revenues).

 

Analysis of results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig. 7.1 Total collection of Revenue streams in 2013/2014/2015

 

In order to ascertain the trend in revenue streams receipts over the years, the total receipts of these streams (instead of EITI reconciliation receipts) in 2013, 2014 and 2015 were used. This was to have a holistic view of revenue receipts, and also to eliminate the effect of a particular year, as EITI coverage is not uniform throughout the years.

 

Between 2014 and 2015, with the exception of community development fund, the values of all the revenue streams received decreased.

 

Mining and exploration licence fees

 

 Mining licence and exploration fees   reduced from US$9,100,000 to US$5,849,357 a percentage drop of about 36%. That trend has started from 2013(See fig. 7.1), as there was also a decrease in mining licence and exploration receipts in 2015. Future receipts should be monitored as it is suggesting the slowing down of mining activities with consequences on the sustainability of the industry. The effect of the Ebola epidemic may have contributed to this trend, future trends will send a clearer picture.

 

Mineral Royalty

 

Mineral royalty receipts dropped from US$30,424,895 in 2014 to US$9,225,535 IN 2015. This was largely due to the fall in the price of iron ore and also a significant decrease in the volumes of minerals produced. (See section 4 on production). The decrease in mineral royalty in 2015 is consistent with the drop in production in 2015 due to a slump in iron prices and the consequential closure of some iron mines.

 

However is worth noting that the trend has started in 2013, as there was also a drop in mineral royalty receipts between 2013 and 2014. This should needs scrutiny and monitoring as sharp drops in prices and royalty has a very serious effect on the budget. The country may consider having a fund to cushion its budget during periods of low commodity prices.

 

Export duty on Diamond

 

Just like the other revenue streams, there was a reduction in the amount collected by the government as export duty on diamonds in 2015 as compared to 2014.  The reduction was however not as severe as that of mineral royalty.

 

Again although there was a reduction in export duty on diamonds in 2015, there was an increase in the collection between 2013 and 2014. The decrease in 2015 however may be attributed to the general economic situation in the country at that period.

 

Diamond Exporters licence

This followed the pattern of the export duty on diamonds. There is a correlation between export duty on diamonds and diamond licence fees. It is expected that as more diamond licence fees are paid more diamond exports will occur leading to a higher export duty payment.

 

Diamond exporters licence fees declined from US$2,900,000 in 2014 to US$204,316 in 2015. Being it that there was an increase in amount received between 2013 and 2014, and also following the same trend as duty on diamond exported it may be concluded that the environment in 2015 caused the decline.

 

Corporate Tax

 

Corporate tax payment also followed the trend experienced by the other revenue streams. It decreased from US$900,000 in 2014 to US$488,205 in 2015. Earlier in 2013, an amount of US$1,250,180 has been recorded. Thus the reduction started before 2014. Being it that major producing companies had passed the initial capital recovery stage, where due to high capital allowances, companies pay nil or low corporate taxes it is important for this trend to be monitored. Post Ebola and post low iron ore prices monitoring should provide a cue if corporate tax payments and its associated fiscal regime should be overhauled. Apart from mineral royalty, corporate tax is expected to provide a substantial amount of revenue to the state.

 

Surface Rent

 

There was a decline in surface rent payments in 2015, as compared to 2014 (See fig. 7.1). This may have resulted partly from the closure of some mines in 2015. As indicated in earlier reports, surface right payments may be centralized in one government Agency, to enable effective monitoring.

 

 Environmental fees

 

There were declines in the payment for environmental licence fees and that of environmental impact assessment licence fees and the monitoring fees. Their decline was however moderate compared to others such as mineral royalty and diamond exporters licence fees.

 

Community development Fund

 

There was no change in the value of community development fund between 2014 and 2015. In 2015 only Sierra Minerals Ltd, reported community development fund payment. The company indicated the payment is jointly managed with Moyamba District Council. There was no confirmation from Moyamba District Council.

 

7.2  REVENUE ALLOCATIONS AND DISTRIBUTION OF REVENUE

In principle, all revenues are transferred to Sierra Leone National Treasury.

Thus revenues from extractive industries are not separately reported in the national   budget; but they are recorded primarily as departmental receipts as part of the overall tax revenue estimates for each tax category of the budget books prepared for each year

 

 

 

 

 

8.0 CONTRIBUTION TO THE ECONOMY IN 2015 AND 2016

 

Contribution of the Mining sector to the Economy

According to IMF, Real Gross Domestic Growth (GDP) recovered from -21.1% in 2015 to 4.3% in 2016. The economy had proved resilient in the face of the collapse of iron ore prices and associated production slump in period 2014-2015. Since the last quarter of 2015, economic growth has resumed.

 

Figure 8.1: Minerals contributed about 95% of total national exports in 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 8.1: Government revenues from Mining benefits in 2015 and 2016 are listed below

2015
Benefit Stream Amount

($’000)

%  
Mining License 5,849.35 10.7  
Petroleum Surface Rents 0    
Royalties 9,225.53 16.9  
Petroleum Training Fund 0    
Mining Witholding 5% Contract 4,207 7.7  
Mining Witholding 10% Rent 7.27 0  
Mining Payroll Tax 18,249 33.4  
Petroleum Bonuses 0    
Corporate Tax 488 0.9  
Petroleum Extension Fees 0    
Petroleum Sale of Geophysical Data 0    
Mining PAYE 14,596 26.7  
Import Duty 2,051 3.7  
Import GST 0    
Witholding 3% Income Tax 0    
Total Mining 54,673.15 100  
Petroleum Directorate Collections 0    
EI Collections 54,673.15 100  

Figure 8.2: Contribution of Major Revenue to National Totals -2015

Employment in the extractive industry 

According the latest census conducted in 2015, 3% of Sierra Leonean workforce was engaged in the mining and quarrying. Of this figure 12.8% was in some form of wage employment indicating a high proportion of miners are in the artisanal category.

Table 8.2: Employment Details in 2015

Description National Mining & Quarrying % Remark
Total Employment 2,758,872 82,255 3.0 Percentage of Total Employment
                  o/w Males 1,400,361 63,583 77.3 Percentage of Total in Mining & Quarrying
                  o/w Female 1,358,511 18,669 22.7 Percentage of Total in Mining & Quarrying
Paid Employees 275,454 10,301 12.5 Percentage of National Total
                  o/w Males 200,679 9,081 88.2 Percentage of Mining Paid Employees
                  o/w  Females 74,775 1,220 11.2 Percentage of Mining Paid Employees
Self –Employment 2,137,791 60,615 73.7 Percentage of National Total
                  o/w Self Employment with Employees(Employer) 121,740 5,461 9.0 Percentage of  Mining Self Employment
Unpaid Family worker 146,775 1,861 2.3 Percentage of National Total
Paid Apprentice 16,553 1,329 8.0 Percentage of National Total
Unpaid Apprentice 38,650 1,066 2.8 Percentage of National Total
Worked Before but currently looking for work 21,909 1,619 7.38 Percentage of National Total

 

INFORMAL ECONOMY

According to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the informal of Sierra Leone 42% in the period from 2010-2014. Source: IMF WP/17/156.[7]

8.1 EXTRACTIVES CONTRIBUTION TO GDP

Agriculture, including forestry, fishing and hunting, continued to account for more than half of GDP in 2016, its relative weight increased from 50.5% in 2014 to 60.9 in 2016) Mining and quarrying having drastically reduced from (20.2% in 2014 to 2.7% in  2015).

Table 8.3 GDP by Sector (percentage of GDP at current prices)

Sub Sector

 

2010 2014 2016
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 56.0 50.5 60.9
of which fishing 9.5 10.5 12.4
Mining and quarrying 4.2 20.2 2.7
of which oil
Manufacturing 2.3 1.6 1.9
Electricity Gas and water 0.3 0.3 0.2
Construction 1.4 0.9 1.0
Wholesale and retail trade; Repair of vehicles household goods; Restaurants and hotels 9.7 7.7 9.9
of which hotels and restaurants 0.4 0.3 0.4
Transport, storage and communication 6.1 3.8 4.2
Finance real estate and business services 3.4 2.4 2.9
Public Administration and defence 4.3 4.4 6.9
Other Services 12.3 8.2
GDP at basic prices/factor cost 100 100 100

Source: www.africaneconomicoutlook.org

Contribution to Government Revenues

Mining contributions to NRA Revenue collections was 8.8 % in 2016 compared with 12.5 % in 2015.

Table 8.4: Contribution of Mining Revenues to Total NRA Collections

Tax Stream   2014   2015     2016    
  Amount(LeM) % of Mine Revenue % Total NRA Collections Amount(LeM) % of Mines Revenue % of Total NRA Collections Amount (LeM) % of Mine Revenue % of Total NRA Revenue
Non Tax Mines Revenue  186,675

 

48

 

9

 

79,419 29 3.5 134,813 55 4.9
Mining Licence            o/w  41,549

 

11

 

2

 

33,745 12 1.5 35,003 14 1.3
Mines and Minerals Royalty                          o/w 145,125

 

38

 

7

 

45,674 17 2.0 99,810 40 3.6
Income Tax Revenue 190,100

 

49

 

 

 

 

9

 

188,350 68 8.4 98,059 40 3.5
Customs and Excise 9,182

 

2

 

0

 

10,497 3 0.5 12,607 5 0.5
Total Mines Revenue 385,956

 

100 17.7 278,267 100 12.5 245,480 100 8.8
Total NRA Revenue 2,174,379     2,235,000     2,799,000[8]    
GDP 20,432,100     21,285,500[9]     22,690,000[10]    
Mining & Quarrying GDP 4,127,284           612,630    
Total Domestic Revenue[11]       2,333,175     2,966,982    

Source: NRA[12]

 

 

GDP Growth

Developments in the real sector of the economy remained subdued in 2015 largely on account of the collapse of iron ore prices and the closure of the two major iron ore mining companies.

 

Real GDP growth contracted by 21.5 percent in 2015 compared to a growth rate of 4.61percent in 2014.

Source: https://www.bsl.gov.sl

 

However it is estimated that the economy sprang back the following year registering a growth of 4.3% in 2016.

 

Table 8.5: National GDP Growth[13]

Year 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016(e)[14]
Real GDP Growth 15.2 20.7 4.6 -21.1 4.3

Source:

 

Contribution to Local Content

  1. Employment: Minimum percentage for Sierra Leone nationals among enterprises managerial and intermediate employees (50%)
  2. Use of Local goods and Services: Companies must use certain amounts of local materials in key sectors(including 10% of domestically available granite in cement)
  3. Nationals Preference in Contracts: Consideration to Sierra Leonean companies for mining and petroleum awards and licenses.

Companies are required to submit local content plans to demonstrate compliance and violations are subject to fines, the loss of investment incentives and civil forfeiture.

Government Participation in Oil and gas

The E&P Act makes provisions for the State National Oil Company (SNOC) to acquire a participation interest on a standalone and commercial basis and/or to hold a participation interest on behalf of the Government.

Budget Preparation 

Section 107 of the Constitution of Sierra Leone mandates the Minister for Finance to prepare and lay before Parliament in each financial year estimates of the revenues and expenditures of Sierra Leone for the following financial year. The Ministry of Finance and Economic Development (MoFED) initiates the Budget Preparation Strategy Phase which deals principally with policy. The elements that comprise this phase include: the National Strategy; Ministries Department Agencies (MDA)/Sector Planning; Macro-fiscal analysis and forecasting; Public Investment Planning; External Assistance planning; and the Budget Policy Hearings.

The Budget Policy Hearings afford MDAs opportunity to defend the alignment of their budgets to the strategic plan of the government. The outcome of these processes is documented in a Budget Framework Paper which provides advice to the Government on the strategy to be adopted in the medium term budget.

A Budget Call Circular is prepared by MoFED in the first week of July each year after Cabinet’s approval of Budget Framework Paper to allow MDAs to prepare detailed budget proposals for the budget year. MoFED analyses the budget proposals from the MDAs and later engages them in public budget discussions. MoFED consolidates the MDA budgets into a Government budget for reference to Cabinet for approval. The Cabinet approved budget proposal is then presented to Parliament by the Sector Minister for legislative approval. After various Parliamentary debates the Appropriation Bill is then passed into an Act to give the budget a legal backing.

 

Budget Implementation

 

At implementation, MDAs are required to complete Medium Term Expenditure Framework/Public Expenditure Tracking Survey Forms I and II for the release/expending of their quarterly allocations as well as quarterly procurement and cash flow plans to MoFED. Vote controllers within the various MDAs capture expenditures for the Accountant-General.

Budget Audit

 

Section 119 of the constitution of Sierra Leone mandates the Auditor General to audit the Public Accounts of Sierra Leone and all public offices, including courts, the accounts of the Central and Local Government Administration, of university and public institutions of like nature, statutory corporations, companies or other bodies and organizations, established by an Act of Parliament or statutory instrument or otherwise set up partly or wholly out of public funds shall be audited and reported by or on behalf of the Auditor General. http://www.sierra-leone.org/Laws/constitution1991.pdf

 

Vote controllers prepare financial statements for the year within one month after the end of the financial year to the Accountant-General to consolidate and prepare the government’s budget.

 

Other Report

 

Sierra Leone’s Annual Financial Report, includes information on revenues and other funds received and spent by the Government during the financial year. The Annual Financial Report is also on www.mofed.gov.sl/annualbudgetrep.htm

Revenues Recorded in State Budget (Consolidated Account)

 

The NRA is mandated for the collection of all taxes on mining. Once minerals are monetized the revenues due to the State are paid to NRA which receives most of Sierra Leone’s taxes from the mining sector.

The other payments from the mining sector are made to local councils and Chiefdoms, where mining companies are based, to the Ministry of Mines and Mineral Development and the Petroleum Directorate in the case of Oil and Gas revenues.

 

Once payments are lodged at the Consolidated Fund/Treasury they lose their identity.

 

In accordance with Section 54(2b) of the Government Budgeting and Accountability Act, 2005 a Statement of Receipts into and the Payments out of Consolidated Fund for the year is published

 

The Bank of Sierra Leone also publishes annual report on government’s fiscal operations.

BENEFIT STREAM RECORDED IN BUDGET

Revenues from the various collecting agencies are categorized under Mines Department and are recorded both as actuals in the reporting year or as projections in ensuing years. The budget profile for years 2015-2019 culled from the 2017 budget statement provides details of mining royalties and licenses collections is indicated below.

Table 8.6 Sections of the Budget profile for years 2015-2019. Amounts in Millions of Leones (LeM)

Benefit 2015   2016   2017   2018   2019  
  Amount % Amount % Amount % Amount % Amount %
Revenue & Grants 3,494712 15.2 3,553,517 13.4 4,552,99 15.0 5,172,715 14.8 6,193,993 15.3
Domestic Revenue 2,330,159 10.1 2,797,964 10.5 3,596,098 11.8 4,134,318 11.8 4,998,296 12.4
Mines Dept. 86,528 0.4 155,196 0.6 167,567 0.6 192,646 0.6 232,905 0.6
Royalties-Rutile 7,836 0 36,113 0.1 37,478 0.1 43,087 0.1 52,091 0.1
Royalties-Bauxite 6,476 0 9,289 0 9,313 0 10,707 0 12,944 0
Royalties- Diamond &Gold 28,485 0.1 25,836 0.1 36,442 0.1 41,896 0.1 50,652 0.1
Royalties-Iron Ore 6,119 0 40,164 0.2 48,587 0.2 55,859 0.2 67,532 0.2
Licenses 37,613 0.2 43,792 0.2 35,747 0.1 41,097 0.1 49,686 0.1

Source: http://www.parliament.gov.sl/dnn5/Portals/0/2014%20DOCUMENT/BUDGET/2017%20Budget%20Speech%20and%20Profile.pdf

Petroleum Directorate

Funds are paid to the Treasury.

Ministry of Mines and Minerals Resources

Funds collected are paid to the Treasury.

 

Mining Revenue Management                                                    

The contributions by mining companies therefore lose their identity once they are deposited into the consolidated fund. Their use cannot therefore be tracked to public investment/expenditure or to expenditure units/cost centers or project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.0 SUB NATIONAL PAYMENTS

Local government operates in a single tier with 13 district councils and six city councils. All 19 local councils are governed by the Local Government Act 2004, which gives councils legislative, financial and administrative powers

Source: http://www.clgf.org.uk/default/assets/File/Country_profiles/Sierra_Leone.pdf

 

The Local Government Act 2004 gives both local councils and chiefdom councils powers to raise revenue from sources including local taxes, property rates, licences, fees and charges, and to receive mining revenue, interest and dividends etc. The chiefdom councils also have traditional sources of revenue, mainly local taxes and fees from local markets.

Surface rent is paid by companies or holders of mining licence and shared amongst five categories of recipients as follows:

  • 50%-Land owners
  • 15%-Paramount chief
  • 15%-District councils
  • 10%-Chiefdom Council
  • 10%-Constituency development

 

In 2015 surface rentals paid by mining licence holders and the distributions are shown below. Only amounts received by District councils, Chiefdoms and MPs’(i.e. 35%) were reconciled and therefore considered as in-scope. Surface rentals due to individuals and paramount chiefs were considered out of scope. See details below

Table: 9.1 Surface Rental Paid By Sierra Minerals In 2015 And Distribution

 

 

Recipients

Amount Paid By Company

              U$$

Amount Received(US$)
In-Scope Out Of Scope
Moyamba District Council 14,238.80 14,238.80
Bonthe District Council 1,789.60 1,789.60
Bo District Council 4,115.40 4115.40
Constituency Dev. Funds 13,429.10 13,429.10
Upper Banta Chiefdom                                   7,566.00          7,566.00
Lower Banta Chiefdom 1,411.80 1,411.80
Dasse Chiefdom                                      357.75             357.75
Kpanda Kemo Chiefdom 1,349.80 1,349.80
Bumpe Ngao Chiefdom 2,743.60 2,743.60
Paramount Chiefs 20,143.65 20,143.65
Landowners 67,145.50 67,145.50
Total                               134,291.00         47,001.85 87,289.15

           

 

 

 Table 9.2: Surface Rental paid by Shandon Steel  in 2015 and Distribution

Recipients Amount Paid by Company

                 US$

Amount Received(US$)
In-scope Out of scope
Total 23,415 8,195 15,220

 

 

Table 9.3: Surface Rental paid by Koidu Holdings in 2015 and Distribution*

Recipients

 

 

 

Recipients

Amount Paid by Company (US$) Amount Received(US$)

 

 

In-scope Out of scope
Kono District Council-5% 3,292.95 3,295.95
Koidu New Sembehen City Council-10% 6,585.90 6,585.90
Tankoro Chiefdom-10% 6,585.90 6,585.90
Paramount Chief-Tankoro Chiefdom-15% 9,878.85 9,878.85
Constituency  Development Fund-10% 6,585.90 6,585.90
Landowners-50% 32,929.50 32,929.50
Total                             65,859

 

23,053.65 42,805.35

*Payments made by MLoGRD

 

Mining Revenue Transfer to Sub National Government

The delivery of public goods and services in Sierra Leone remains centralised. The budget does not show expenditure by geographical locations but rather by line ministry, which means it is difficult to track where money is actually spent on host mining communities.

 

However, there are specific contributions by mining companies which are meant to be applied to certain district councils and chiefdoms for social development.

9.1 Diamond Area Community Development Fund (DACDF)

As a way of generating money for the DACDF, every year the government levies a 3 % tax on the value of all diamonds mined by holders of artisanal mining licenses.

25 % of that 3% is what government gives to the DACD fund. In other words the government deposits 0.75 % of the total export value of artisanal diamonds in the DACDF account that is jointly operated by the Ministries of Mines and Local Government

Government allocates the money in the form of percentage to three (3) broad categories, these include;

(1)  20% allocated to District Councils

(2) 20% allocated to Chiefdom Councils

(3) 60% allocated to Chiefdom Councils Based on Artisanal Mining Licenses

Disbursement to Chiefdoms

Method of DACDF money distribution to chiefdom councils involving the following sequential steps: submit Artisanal Mining Licenses Registers of Mines and Local Government

  • The Government Mines Engineers submit Artisanal Mining Licenses Registers to the Directors of Mines and Local Government
  • The Directors of Mines and Local Government prepares and submits a national DACDF disbursement form to the Ministers of Mines and Local Government
  • The Ministers of Mines and Local Government approves the request and instruct officials to prepare cheques in the names of the respective chiefdom councils
  • In the chiefdoms, the government officials call up a big chiefdom meeting at the court barray and hand over the money to the chiefdom in the full view of all those present at the meeting

Source: http://documents.worldbank.org

 

 

Some payments to Chiefdoms and District councils in 2015 are shown below in Appendix 5.

 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

Only Sierra Minerals reported the payment of community development fund in 2015.

According to Sierra Minerals this fund is jointly managed by Vimetco Sierra Minerals and the Moyamba District Council. Moyamba District Council however did not report any community development fund on its template.

Table 9.4:  Community Development  Fund payment made by  Vimetco Sierra Minerals in 2015.

Company Date Le US$
Sierra Minerals Ltd 16.01.2015

03.07.2015

11.11.2015

22.12.2015

466,031,650

240,000,000

166,442,902

216,000,000

93,206.33

48,000.00

33,288.58

43,200.00

Total   1.088.474,552 217,694.91

 

Sovereign Wealth Funds

Sierra Leone has no Sovereign Wealth Funds at the moment.

SUSTAINABILITY AND RESOURCE DEPENDENCE

The economy shrank by 21% in 2015 due to the impact of the Ebola epidemic and suspension of iron ore production but sprang to 4.3% in 2016. Real GDP is projected to grow by 5.4 percent in 2017; 5.8 percent in 2018; and 6.1 percent in 2019. This growth will be driven mainly by the expected increases in iron ore production among others.

 

Exports are also projected to recover strongly by 16.8 percent in 2017 and 23.7 percent in 2018 before stabilizing at 5 percent in 2019 when iron ore production reaches its peak. Revenues from iron ore, diamonds and gold are expected to improve significantly in 2017 to 2019 as indicated in in the 2017 budget statement.

Source:http://www.parliament.gov.sl/dnn5/Portals/0/2014%20DOCUMENT/BUDGET/2017%20Budget%20Speech%20and%20Profile.pdf

 

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

The Mines and Minerals Act (2009) requires that holders of small scale or large scale mining licenses assist in the development of mining communities affected by operations to promote sustainable development. All license holders must have a Community Development Agreement (CDA) with the primary host community when the mining firm has an output of more than 1 million cubic meters per year from alluvial deposits or from underground mining operations where combined run of mine ore and waste production is more than 100,000 tons per year (other requirements are also established).

 

The company must spend no less than 1% of 1% of the gross revenue amount earned by mining operations in the previous year. The terms of the CDA must be negotiated with the community and should address: social and economic contributions for sustainability of the community; assistance in creating self-sustaining, income generating activities such as production of goods and services needed by the mine and community; consultation regarding mine closure; agriculture; environmental and socio economic management and local governance enhancement. CDA must outline how it will be monitored and how the community will participate in planning and monitoring.

Source: http://ccsi.columbia.edu/files/2015/01/Community-DevelopmentRequirements-in-Mining-Laws

 

 

 

10.0 OUTCOMES AND IMPACT

10.1 UPDATE ON RECOMMENDATIONS

Some findings and recommendations made in previous report which according to the EITI secretariat are receiving attention includes the following (See Table 10.1)

 Table 10.1: Update on previous recommendation

   
1.      RING FENCING BY MINING LEASE:

Observation:  Section 155(1) of MMA, 2009 provides for separate accounting for all large-scale mining licenses. However section 155(4) of MMA,2009 also stipulates that the ‘holder of a large scale mining license may, with the Minister’s approval, deduct exploration expenditure in determining chargeable income attributable to any large scale mining license provided the expenditures were incurred by the license holder on reconnaissance and exploration licenses within Sierra Leone’.

 

 Whilst this may have been intended to encourage and promote exploration, it has the potential of delaying    corporate tax payment or reducing the quantum of payment significantly. As companies engage in mineral production, corporate tax payment can become a significant revenue stream for government.   Again it also will grant undue advantage to existing companies with mining licenses. 

Recommendation

The MMMR/NMA should make a policy determination as to the state of exploration and reconnaissance in the country. Thus if the MMMR considers that there still exists significant green fields, then section 155(4) of MMA,2009 on reconnaissance and exploration may be maintained

 

Response by NMA/Action taken

 

Exploration assets in Sierra Leone are mostly greenfield. We therefore recommend that section 155(4) of MMA, 2009 on reconnaissance and exploration may be maintained.  However, a successful completion of the proposed National Aeromagnetic Survey and follow up sampling of potential anomalies could increase the number of brownfields.

 

2.      SURFACE RENT

 

Observation

The Mines and Minerals Act, 2009 (MMA2009) section 35 stipulates the payment of compensation or surface rent to owner of the land: Presently the amounts payable are determined by negotiations between the landowner and the company concerned

 

Whilst some companies make payments to District Councils and the Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development with cheques for onward distribution to recipients, however others also pay directly to chiefdoms, individuals, paramount chiefs and members of parliament. Reconciliation of payments made directly to Chiefdoms and District councils is often very challenging.

 

Recommendation

Payment and collection may be streamlined to ensure standardization and transparency. 

 

For payments made in cash, bodies with functional accounting units such as district councils may receive payments from the companies. They will in turn pay the chiefdoms and other recipients and properly keep the accounting records.

 

This will enhance transparency and accountability

 

Response by NMA/Action taken

Section 35 of the Mines and Minerals stipulates the distribution of surface rent payment only. The recommendation for the cost per square kilometer to be indicated in Mining Lease Agreement is in place. This recommendation will be taken into consideration in the current review of the Core Minerals Policy and the Model Mine Development Agreement

 

SENSITIZATION WORKSHOPS

Dissemination of SLEITI reports is adding value to the management of the extractive sector.

Participants to SLEITI sensitization workshops discuss, criticize and make recommendations which help to enhance the management of the extractive sector.

Citizens are able to determine for themselves if the extractive sector policies and laws are adequate

According to the EITI secretariat, through SLEITI reports, the public is made aware of issues in the extractive sector.

Some of the issues raised at these workshops include;

  • Sensitization workshops
  • Roles and coordination amongst MDAs’
  • Extractive sector contributions to the economy
  • The role of civil society in the governance of the sector

Natural resource dependency and economic diversification

 

 

 

 

 

11.0OBSERVATIONS AND SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS.

OBSERVATION

 

PARENT/HOLDING COMPANIES AND EXTRACTIVE SECTOR PAYMENTS.

 

It was observed that in the making of extractive payments the names of   companies reported are sometimes different from those maintained by the NMA. There were instances when some parent/holding companies made payments, but the names of the subsidiaries on whose behalf the payments are made were not indicated. Shandon Steel Ltd, made payments to EPA and NRA, however it was not specified whether the payment was being made on behalf of Tonkolili (iron ore) Ltd or African Railways and Ports Services Ltd, which are subsidiaries of Shandon Steel Ltd.

 

Recommendation:

Payments made on behalf of mineral right holders should be recorded properly against the names of such companies and not the parent/holding companies.

This can also assist in project level reporting.

 

OBSERVATION

The NRA could not provide its templates within the stipulated time. Templates were delivered just some few days to the publication of the report.

Recommendation

The NRA is strategically very important for the reconciliation process. The major revenue streams including mineral royalty, corporate tax, diamond exporters licence fees, mining and exploration licences are all collected by that agency. It is therefore very important that it provides templates on a timely manner.

 

       FISCAL TERMS AND STABILITY

 

A review of the agreements published by the NMA, indicate that there are   stability clauses especially     regarding royalty and corporate income tax rates. The rates also differ amongst companies.

 

 

Recommendation:

As much as practicable, the MMMR/NMA should establish fiscal terms that are uniform for all contracts. This should be enforced especially for corporate tax and royalty. This is because, these revenue streams are expected to bring in the biggest revenues, and any tinkering with them is likely to reduce significantly the extractive revenues.

 

APPROPRIATE PAYMENT NARRATION

Payments for some mining benefits were made out in the names of other benefit streams. A case in point is the issue of payroll tax in 2015. An amount of US$18,249,395.02. This amount appeared very big for payroll tax, as this is tax paid on for foreign employees.  PAYE payments could probably have ben categorized as Payroll tax.

Recommendation

Categorization of payroll tax and other payments should be done strictly according to the reason for the payment. This will forestall incidences where payments are classified as material, whereas in the reality they are insignificant.

12.0 CONCLUSION

 

Mineral royalty payment still led in 2015 as the highest revenue earner.

Corporate tax receipt has not attained the level expected yet.

The reconciliation produced a net discrepancy of US$354,159, and an absolute discrepancy of US$870,507 representing 2.95% and 7.26% of government receipts respectively.

Due to time constraints, the Independent Administrator was unable to resolve a significant part of discrepancies. The MSG should with the assistance of company and government agencies representatives, resolve any outstanding discrepancies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDICES

 

  Appendix 1:   Revenue streams used for the determination of materiality in 2015

Revenues received by  the NRA US$ %
Mining Licences (US $)            5,849,357.29 27.9132
Mineral Resources Royalty (US $)            9,225,535.47 44.0244
Corporate Tax (US $)               488,205.20 2.3297
Gold dealers Licence                 25,707.20 0.1227
Gold Exporters Licence                 90,551.00 0.4321
Diamond exporters Licence               546,249.00 2.6067
Diamond dealers Licence               204,316.93 0.9750
Total          16,429,922.08 78.4038
Revenues received by EPA
Licenses Fees US$ 1,595,670.00 7.6146
Monitriong Fees US$ 319,074.00 1.5226
Total 1,914,744.00 9.1372
Revenues reeived by Precious Minerals Trading(GGDO)
Gold
Export duty on gold               109,995.65 0.5249
2.5% CONSOLIDATED REVENUE                 91,663.04 0.4374
0.5% GGDO VALUATION                 18,332.61 0.0875
Total               219,991.30 1.0498
Diamond
Export duty on diamonds            2,390,857.32 11.4092
           2,390,857.32 11.4092
Grand Total          20,955,514.71 100.00

Appendix 2: List of companies/ extractive industry entities that meet the materiality threshold in 2015

NAME OF COMPANY/ENTITY                  Amount % of total revenue Cumulative Percentage
1 KOIDU LTD.                   6,399,639.33 30.54                 30.54
2 SIERRA RUTILE LTD.                   2,898,384.35 13.83                 44.37
3 TIMIS MINING CORPORATION (SL) LTD.                   2,341,235.12 11.17                 55.54
4 SIERRA MINERALS HOLDINGS LTD                   1,806,517.26 8.62                 64.16
5 H.M DIAMONDS                   1,613,721.08 7.70                 71.86
6 TONKOLILI IRON ORE (SL) LIMITED                   1,000,000.00 4.77                 76.64
7 S. D. Steel (SL) Ltd                       535,008.00 2.55                 79.19
8 AFRICAN RAILWAY & PORT SERVICES                       500,000.00 2.39                 81.58
9 KASSIM M.BASMA                       466,832.20 2.23                 83.80
10 AMARA MINING SL LIMITED IRO BAOMAHUN GOLD LIMITED CLUFF                       431,960.09 2.06                 85.86
11 AMR GOLD SL LTD IRO WILKINSON  HILL MINING                       263,896.00 1.26                 87.12
12 SHAWKIE B SHOUR                       217,291.08 1.04                 88.16

Appendix 3: Out of scope companies/extractive Entities-2015

13 NIMIKORO GUOJI MINING COPMANY                       145,536.00 0.69                 88.85
14 Marapa Iron Ore (SL) Ltd                       133,560.00 0.64                 89.49
15 B.K. MINERALS & PETROLEUM PRODUCT SL. LTD                       130,646.11 0.62                 90.12
16 ALLOTROPES DIAMOND COMPANY LTD                       130,024.87 0.62                 90.74
17 GEMSTAR DIAMOND (PVT) LIMITED                       119,182.32 0.57                 91.31
18 ATLANTIC MINERALS (SL) LTD                         96,173.00 0.46                 91.76
19 Nimini Mining Limited                         71,712.00 0.34                 92.11
20 MURRY INVESTMENT COMPANY                         67,069.05 0.32                 92.43
21 ALEXANDRIA CARMEL DIAMONDS LIMITED                         58,353.25 0.28                 92.70
22 UNIVERSAL DAWNUS SL LTD.                         55,300.00 0.26                 92.97
23 JINXIANG MINING CO (SL) LTD                         52,444.20 0.25                 93.22
24 OCEAN SAND ENERGY LIMITED                         52,140.03 0.25                 93.47
25 AMADEX SL LTD                         51,733.99 0.25                 93.71
26 K. MINERALS FARMING LIMITED                         48,378.71 0.23                 93.95
27 ALCOC & PARTNERS (SL) LTD                         46,530.94 0.22                 94.17
28 SOUTHERN MINIRAL INVESTMENT CO LTD                         43,075.00 0.21                 94.37
29 TOTAL GLOBAL STEEL COMPANY                         41,416.00 0.20                 94.57
30 CONTINENTAL AFRICA MINERALS LTD                         38,085.87 0.18                 94.75
31 BAGR BERLINER ALUMINIUM WERK                         37,804.00 0.18                 94.93
32 ARCHETYPE DIAMONDS (SL) LTD                         37,501.00 0.18                 95.11
33 TAMBA ENTOCHEMA EBBA                         36,539.00 0.17                 95.29
34 AGIM NUHAJ                         35,000.00 0.17                 95.45
35 BLUE STONE MINERAL COMPANY (SL) LTD                         35,000.00 0.17                 95.62
36 MUNDAY INVESTMENT CO.                         35,000.00 0.17                 95.79
37 TAIDE TRADING SL LTD                         34,527.67 0.16                 95.95
38 GOLDEN SAINT RESOURCES (AFRICA) LTD                         34,177.37 0.16                 96.12
39 BME (Division of Omnia Group (Pty) Ltd                         32,112.00 0.15                 96.27
40 WEST AFRICAN UNION COMPANY LTD                         31,423.00 0.15                 96.42
41 UNIVERSAL GOLD MINING & EXPLORATION                         31,416.00 0.15                 96.57
42 CENTRAL MONING COMPANY                         30,880.00 0.15                 96.72
43 GOLF TRANSPORT IRO MATRIX EXPLORATION & PRODUCTION CO LTD                         30,016.00 0.14                 96.86
44 HUIXIN GOLD MINING & ENGINEERING                         30,000.00 0.14                 97.00

 

45 BAUMIN GOLD SL LTD                         24,692.00 0.12                 97.12
46 KARAM GLOBAL CONSULTANTS IRO YIJINYUAN (SL_ LTD                         22,376.00 0.11                 97.23
47 ALOV HOLDING LIMITED                         22,231.00 0.11                 97.33
48 BOROMA                         21,720.86 0.10                 97.44
49 TRILLIUM INT’L OFFSHORE (SL) LTD                         20,000.00 0.10                 97.53
50 MINATURA                         18,501.00 0.09                 97.62
51 ANANT  RESOURCES                         16,308.00 0.08                 97.70
52 CHAUADI INTERNATIONAL MINERALS LTD                         16,112.00 0.08                 97.77
53 BLUE HORIZON (SL) LTD                         15,300.00 0.07                 97.85
54 UNIVERSAL GOLD MINNING AND EXPORT                         14,308.50 0.07                 97.92
55 AKA PETROLEUM GMBH                         14,165.00 0.07                 97.98
56 GERMINATE SL LTD                         13,038.00 0.06                 98.05
57 ALIMURING  SARI MINING INDUSTRY LTD                         12,316.00 0.06                 98.10
58 MANTE ORE MINING COMPANY LIMITED                           9,750.00 0.05                 98.15
59 ZINIZTS LIMITED                           9,568.22 0.05                 98.20
60 CHAINA INT’L MINING COMPANY                           9,284.00 0.04                 98.24
61 EQUITY INVESTMENT E PARTICIPACOES (SL) LTD                           9,112.52 0.04                 98.28
62 SALLY JOAN FORSTER                           7,761.00 0.04                 98.32
63 Vimetco Exploration Company-Kambia                           7,596.00 0.04                 98.36
64 FOLORIN A F ADEDAYO                           7,500.00 0.04                 98.39
65 LION DESTINY LINE                           7,500.00 0.04                 98.43
66 SAVINA DIAMONDS                           7,500.00 0.04                 98.47
67 FAVIC INVESTMENT COMPANY LTD                           7,124.00 0.03                 98.50
68 BORNSTEIN ISRAEL                           7,000.00 0.03                 98.53
69 EDDIE MANUEL NUNEZ                           7,000.00 0.03                 98.57
70 GLOVANNI BARBATTINI                           7,000.00 0.03                 98.60
71 GREGG PARKER LYELL                           7,000.00 0.03                 98.63
72 LION DESTINY SL IRO RINA YAKUEL KERZNER                           7,000.00 0.03                 98.67
73 VIRAL B. DESAI                           7,000.00 0.03                 98.70
74 TROPICAL & NATURAL RESOURCES                           6,823.49 0.03                 98.73
75 SINO SUNNY LTD.                           6,597.00 0.03                 98.76
76 AHMED LEFKAIER                           6,000.00 0.03                 98.79
77 BJORN GREENE                           6,000.00 0.03                 98.82
78 H.M.DIAMONDS IRO AYMAN TALEH                           6,000.00 0.03                 98.85
79 H.M.DIAMONDS IRO MOHAMED I                           6,000.00 0.03                 98.88
80 H.M.DIAMONDS IRO MOHAMED MANSOUR                           6,000.00 0.03                 98.91
81 KASSIM A. BASMA IRO AKRAM DAGHER                           6,000.00 0.03                 98.94
82 EREZ VICTOR GOREN                           5,540.54 0.03                 98.96
83 KAI KAI ANSUMANA JAIA                           5,517.00 0.03                 98.99
84 ARWEST AFRICA MINERALS LTD                           5,470.00 0.03                 99.01
85 I ENGINEERING AND GEOLOGICAL SERVICES CO. LTD                           5,126.04 0.02                 99.04
86 JUKAMI INTERNATIONAL (SL) LTD                           5,050.00 0.02                 99.06
87 UNCLE HUANG (SL) LTD                           5,010.00 0.02                 99.09
88 FRANCESS S. TOBY                           5,007.50 0.02                 99.11
89 CHINA F/T COMPANY LIMITED                           5,000.00 0.02                 99.13
90 EL-MACAB INVESTMENT INTERNATIONAL LTD                           5,000.00 0.02                 99.16
91 ENGINEERING & GEOLOGICAL SERVICES CO. LTD                           5,000.00 0.02                 99.18
92 LEE COMPANY LTD                           5,000.00 0.02                 99.21
93 WILKINSON HILL MINING COMPANY                           5,000.00 0.02                 99.23
94 YOUBA BASSOUM                           5,000.00 0.02                 99.25
95 M & S VENTURES LTD                           4,947.00 0.02                 99.28
96 MASSER IRO UNIVERSAL DAWNUS (SL) LIMITED                           4,943.00 0.02                 99.30
97 IRUGUL RESOURCES LIMITED                           4,212.00 0.02                 99.32
98 SIERRA DIAMONDS LIMITED                           3,992.00 0.02                 99.34
99 LION MOUNTAIN MINING & FISHING CO. LTD.                           3,276.00 0.02                 99.36
100 CAVOR LIMITED                           3,235.90 0.02                 99.37
101 ALHAJI IBRAHIMA CEESAY                           3,000.00 0.01                 99.39
102 ALHAJI K CEESAY                           3,000.00 0.01                 99.40
103 IBRAHIM CONTEH                           3,000.00 0.01                 99.41
104 PETER MUTINDA KITUNDU                           3,000.00 0.01                 99.43
105 TINGXIANG MINING COMPANY LTD                           2,974.00 0.01                 99.44
106 SHENZHEN LOKI IRO NEW CIRCLE LIMITED                           2,884.00 0.01                 99.46
107 PRO-POOR COMMUNITY MINERALS                           2,761.60 0.01                 99.47
108 ABU BAKARR BUNDU                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.48
109 ALHAJI CONTEH                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.49
110 ALHAJI I KANU                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.51
111 ALHAJI KALILU BURRIA JALLOH                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.52
112 ALIE FAWAZ HEDJAZI                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.53
113 ALUSINE LAMIN BANGURA                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.54
114 ARNOLD RYAN COKER                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.55
115 BASHIRU JALLOH                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.57
116 FADI S. HAMDAN                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.58
117 JIHAD SAAD                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.59
118 KHALIFA KAMARA                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.60
119 MOHAMED A SKAIKAY                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.61
120 MOHAMED A YANSANEH                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.62
121 MOHAMED ABASS                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.64
122 MOHAMED H. SHUMAN                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.65
123 MOHAMED JANNEH                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.66
124 OSMAN K SESAY                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.67
125 OUSMAN BARRIE                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.68
126 SIA JARIEU BAYOH MORSAY                           2,500.00 0.01                 99.70
127 HM DIAMONDS IRO ALUSINE KAMARA                           2,000.00 0.01                 99.71
128 HM DIAMONDS IRO MOHAMED B JALLOH                           2,000.00 0.01                 99.72
129 MASTER GEMS (SL) LIMITED                           1,914.71 0.01                 99.72
130 BAHORE HYDARA                           1,500.00 0.01                 99.73
131 AMADU W JALLOH                           1,217.98 0.01                 99.74
132 ABDUL GIBRILL SESAY                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.74
133 AHMAD DAGHER                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.75
134 AHMED TALIL                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.75
135 ALFRED KAMARA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.76
136 ALI HASSAN                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.76
137 ALIE BOKUM                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.77
138 ALIE H DAYECK                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.77
139 ALIE SAMURA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.78
140 AMIN A SKAIKAY                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.78
141 BASSAM HAMKA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.79
142 FODAY DARAMY                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.79
143 FOUAD YAHIA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.79
144 HAIDAR ISMAIL                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.80
145 HASSAN ANTAR                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.80
146 HASSSAN HASHIM ISMAIL                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.81
147 HASSSAN JIHAD SAAD                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.81
148 IBRAHIM M JAWARA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.82
149 IDRISSA KABBA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.82
150 ISMAIL SHAMSEDDINE                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.83
151 ISSAM. T. ZINE                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.83
152 MICHAEL S MANSARAY                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.84
153 MOHAMED  A SHOUR                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.84
154 MOHAMED FAWAZ                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.85
155 MOHAMED FOFANAH                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.85
156 MOHAMED J AWADA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.86
157 MOHAMED JAWARA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.86
158 MOHAMED KARIM                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.87
159 MOHAMED LAMIN KAKAY                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.87
160 MOHAMED MAHMOUD KRECHT                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.88
161 MOHAMED SAID DAKHLALLAH                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.88
162 MONZER MOHAMED JAWARD                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.89
163 MOUNTHER JAWARD                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.89
164 MUSA SHERIFF                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.89
165 MUSTAPHA NABAY                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.90
166 NADER H. SHOUR                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.90
167 NASSIM G NASSIM                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.91
168 NOVRN MANSOUR                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.91
169 PABLO M. RIVERA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.92
170 SAIDU DUMBUYA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.92
171 SALIM A DAYECK                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.93
172 SALLIEU SOW                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.93
173 SHAOUKIE A. GHALEB                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.94
174 SORIE SANNAH                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.94
175 SULAIMAN BARRIE                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.95
176 TARAIK MANSOUR                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.95
177 VIRAL B. DESAI IRO ALHAJI LANFIA KABBA                           1,000.00 0.00                 99.96
178 IFEANYI EZWNWANNE                               500.00 0.00                 99.96
179 JORGE ARMANDO DULANTO SAEZ                               466.65 0.00                 99.96
180 PRINCESS T. AMARA                               311.64 0.00                 99.96
181 MOHAMED BAH                               281.16 0.00                 99.96
182 PYTHIAS T.B BART WILLIAMS                               269.60 0.00                 99.97
183 ALIE SANNOH                               156.37 0.00                 99.97
184 MUCTAR BARRIE                               156.37 0.00                 99.97
185 OSMAN JUSU                               156.37 0.00                 99.97
186 IBRAHIM FOFANAH                               155.99 0.00                 99.97
187 IDRISSA MANSARAY                               155.99 0.00                 99.97
188 MOHAMED G DAWO                               155.99 0.00                 99.97
189 MOHAMED KOROMA                               155.99 0.00                 99.97
190 MUSTAPHA MOSIMA                               155.99 0.00                 99.97
191 PATRICK JOHN BISMARK CONTEH                               155.99 0.00                 99.97
192 SAIDU SESAY                               155.99 0.00                 99.97
193 YUSUFU KOROMA                               155.99 0.00                 99.97
194 ABU BAKARR  DUMBUYA                               155.58 0.00                 99.97
195 ALIE KAMARA                               155.58 0.00                 99.98
196 DANIEL KOROMA                               155.58 0.00                 99.98
197 MUSA MANSARAY                               155.58 0.00                 99.98
198 ABDULAI JALLOH                               155.27 0.00                 99.98
199 ABDULAI KANU                               155.27 0.00                 99.98
200 ALHAJI A. JAGITAY                               155.02 0.00                 99.98
201 CHERNOR MADANIE BAH                               155.02 0.00                 99.98
202 DAUDA KONDEH                               155.02 0.00                 99.98
203 ISHMEAL KHELLAH                               155.02 0.00                 99.98
204 SULAIMAN JAGITAY                               155.02 0.00                 99.98
205 ABDUL KAFARR JALLOH                               153.96 0.00                 99.98
206 ABDUL KARIM SESAY                               153.96 0.00                 99.98
207 ALIE S KARGBO                               153.96 0.00                 99.98
208 BARRY ABDUL RAHMAN JALLOH                               153.96 0.00                 99.99
209 OSMAN TURAY                               153.96 0.00                 99.99
210 ALHAJI M SESAY                               152.51 0.00                 99.99
211 JAMES MOORE                               152.51 0.00                 99.99
212 LUSINE KALLON                               152.51 0.00                 99.99
213 MOHAMED S SESAY                               152.51 0.00                 99.99
214 SULAIMAN BENYA                               152.51 0.00                 99.99
215 ARUNA KAMARA                               146.88 0.00                 99.99
216 SAHR E BONA                               146.88 0.00                 99.99
217 UMARU BAH                               146.88 0.00                 99.99
218 AMINATA BANGURA                               139.62 0.00                 99.99
219 MOHAMED SACCOH                               139.62 0.00                 99.99
220 SENESIE DUMBUYA                               134.80 0.00                 99.99
221 SANDE LOKO COOPERATIVE MINING                                 75.90 0.00                 99.99
222 SELLA MULTI PURPOSE COOPERATIVE ORG.                                 75.90 0.00                 99.99
223 ABDUL PESSIMA                                 62.40 0.00                 99.99
224 ABU BAKARR KAMARA                                 62.40 0.00                 99.99
225 BIRO DUMBUYA                                 62.40 0.00              100.00
226 BUNDU KARIM                                 62.40 0.00              100.00
227 JOHN S. KAMARA                                 62.40 0.00              100.00
228 JUSU JOSEPH                                 62.40 0.00              100.00
229 YAGUBA ALHASSAN BARRIE                                 62.23 0.00              100.00
230 FODAY SHEKA FOFANAH                                 62.14 0.00              100.00
231 ABU BAKARR SESAY                                 61.00 0.00              100.00
232 CHERNOR BARRIE                                 61.00 0.00              100.00
233 MOHAMED JALLOH                                 61.00 0.00              100.00
234 OUSMAN THOLLY                                 61.00 0.00              100.00
235 ADAMS KARGBO                                 56.92 0.00              100.00
236 FODAY SESAY                                 56.92 0.00              100.00
237 IBRAHIM S. CONTEH                                 56.92 0.00              100.00
238 SORIE MANSARAY                                 56.92 0.00              100.00
239 AGIBU LAMRANA                                 55.85 0.00              100.00
240 MISBAHU JALLOH                                 55.85 0.00              100.00
241 MUSA BAMBA FORY                                 53.92 0.00              100.00
242 P. J. BART-WILLIAMS                                 30.08 0.00              100.00
243 JOHN KANU                                 28.84 0.00              100.00
244 CHRISTOPHER TODD SCHUMACHER                                 21.00 0.00              100.00
                20,955,514.58                100.00

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 4A PAYEE

This figures have not been validated by the independent administration

PAYEE PAY ROLL TAX IMPORT DUTY
NO. COMPANY 2015 2015 2015
1 KOIDU HOLDINGS 4,743,961,694.00
2 SIERRA RUTILE
3 TIMIS CORPORATION
4 SIERRA MINERALS HOLDINGS 2,423,548,854.00
5 H.M DIAMONDS 20,003,460.00
6 TINKOLILI (IRON) ORE LTD 21,330,094,371.27
7 S.D.STEEL LTD
8 AFRICAN RAILWAYS & PORT SERVICES
9 KASSIM BASMA 985,340.42
10 AMARA MINING LTD
11 AMR GOLD SL LTD – WICKINSON HICC MINING
12 SHAWKE B. SHOUR 826,200

 

This figures have not been validated by the independent administration

APPENDIX 4B  NRA PAYEE

NRA TEMPLATES
PAYEE PAY ROLL TAX IMPORT DUTY
NO. COMPANY 2015 2015 2015
1 KOIDU HOLDINGS
2 SIERRA RUTILE 3,933,960.61 57,500,000.00 860,153,333.21
3 TIMIS CORPORATION 1,795,271,218.00 417,778,699.63
4 SIERRA MINERALS HOLDINGS 3,738,055,759.00 87,393,646.00 6,355,077,315.18
5 H.M DIAMONDS 18,411,465.19
6 TINKOLILI (IRON) ORE LTD 30,414,146,218.71
7 S.D.STEEL LTD
8 AFRICAN RAILWAYS & PORT SERVICES 25,558,072,907.64 348,750,000.00 12,419,942.45
9 KASSIM BASMA
10 AMARA MINING LTD
11 AMR GOLD SL LTD – WICKINSON HICC MINING
12 SHAWKE B. SHOUR

This figures have not been validated by the independent administration

 

APPENDIX 5

MINISTRY OF MINES AND MINERARESOURCES
DIAMOND AREA COMMUNITY DEV. FUND (DACDF) PAYMENT VOUCHER FOR THYEAR 2015
KENEMA DISTRICT-2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 P.C Goroma Mende Chiefdom 64,619,048 43,809,524 108,428,572 29354716
2 P.C Falla Wandor Chiefdom 40,619,048 29,523,810 70,142,875 2935717
3 P.C. Simbaru Chiefdom 43,619,048 29,523,810 73,142,857 2935718
4 P.C Kandu Leppiama Chiefdom 73,619,048 58,095,238 131,714,286 2935720
5 P.C. Small Bo Chiefdom 13,619,048 0 13,619,048 2935721
6 P.C. Nongowa Chiefdom 28,619,048 18,095,238 48,714,286 2935722
7 P.C. Lower Bambara Chiefdom 85,619,048 38,095,238 123,714,286 2935724
8 P.C. Malegohun Chiefdom 36,119,048 26,666,667 62,785,714 2935725
9 P.C Dama Chiefdom 15,119,048 0 15,119,048 2935726
10  P.C.  Nomo Chiefdom 12,119,048 9,523,810 21,642,857 2935727
11 P.C. Dodo Chiefdom 21,119,048 23,809,524 44,928,571 2935728
12 P.C. Koya Chiefdom 13,619,048 0 13,619,048 2335729
13 Chief Administrator Kenema District Council 119,000.00 72,380,952 191,380,952 2935730
TOTAL 567,428,571 349,523,810 916,952,381
BO DISTRICT-2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 P.C. Baoma Chiefdom 45,119,048 29,53,810 74,642,857 2935731
2 P.C. Tikonko Chiefdom 33,119,048 23,809,524 56,928,571 2935732
3 P. C. Lugbu Chiefdom 13,619,048 15,238,095 28,857,143 2935733
4 P.C. Jaiama Bongor Chiefdom 15,119,048 12,380,952 27,500,000 2935734
5 P.C. Badjiia Chiefdom 9,119,048 0 91,119,048 2935735
6 P.C. Valunia Chiedom 9,119,048 12,380,952 21,500,000 2935736
7 P.C. Kakua Chiefdom 9,119,048 0 9,119,048 2935737
8 P.C. Komboya Chiefdom 10,619,048 15,238,095 25,875,143 2935738
9 P.C. Barri Chiefdom 9,119,048 18,095,238 27,214,286 2935739
10 P.Bumpeh Ngao Chiefdom 10,619,048 0 10,619,048 2935740
11 Council 29,500,000 26,666,667 56,166,667 2935741
TOTAL 194,190,476 153,333,333 347,523,810
KONO DISTRICT -2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 P.C. Sandor Chiefdom 88,619,048 35,238,095 123,857,143 2935705
2 P.C. Gbense Chiefdom 73,619,048 38,095,238 111,714,286 2935706
3 P.C. Nimikoro Chiefdom 123,119,048 109,523,810 232,642,857 2935707
4 P. Tankoro Chiefdom 34,619,048 23,809,524 58,428,571 2935708
5 P.C. Gorama Kono Chiefdom 10,619,048 9,523,810 20,142,857 2935710
6 P.C.Nimiyama Chiefdom 97,619,048 60,952,381 158,571,429 2935711
7 P.C. Kamara Chiefdom 70,619,048 40,952,381 111,571,429 2935712
8 Chief Administrator Kon District Council 136,551,191 90,476,190 227,027,381 2935714
9 Kono New Sembehun City Council 11,948,810 0 11,948,810 2935719
TOTAL 1,055,904,762
PUJEHUN DISTRICT -2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 P.C. Makplel Chiefdom 12,119,048 12,380,295 24,500,000 2935744
2 P.C. Sorogbema Chiefdom 9,119,048 0 9,119,048 2935745
3 P.C. Panga Krim Chiefdom 0 9,523,810 9,523,810 2935746
4 P.C. Panga Kabonde Chiefdom 13,619,048 12,380,952 26,000,000 2935748
5 P.C. Malen Chiefdom 12,119,048 0 12,119,048 2935748
6 Chief Administrator Pujehun District Coucil 5,500,000 4,761,905 10,261,905 2935749
TOTAL 52,476,190 39,476,190 39,047,619 91,523,810
TINKOLILI DISTRICT -2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 Konike Sande 10,619,048 10,619,048 2935762
2 Gbonikolenken 9,119,048 9,119,048 2935764
3 Kafe Simira 9,119,048 9,119,048 2935765
4 Chief Administrator Tonkolili District Council 2,000,000 2,000,000 293567
TOTAL 30,857,143 30,857,143
KAILAHUN DISTRCICT -2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 P.C. Njaluahun Chiefdom 16,619,048 9,523,810 26,142,857 2935752
2 P.C. Jawei Chiefdom 19,619,048 15,238,095 34,857,143 2935753
3 P.C. Malema Chiefdom 21,119,048 0 21,119,048 2935754
4 Chief Administrator Kailahun District Council 11,500,000 3,809,524 15,309,524 2935755
TOTAL 68,857,143 28,571,429 97,428,571
KAMBIA DISTRICT-2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 Magbema 9,119,048 9,119,048 2935759
2 Gbinleh-Dixon 10,619,048 10,619,048 2935760
3 Chief Administrator Kambia District Council 1,500 1,500,000 2935761
TOTAL 21,238,095 21,238,095
BOMBALI DISTRICT -2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 Sella Limba 15,119,048 9,523,810 24,642,857 2935756
2 Chief Administrator Bambali District Council 2,500,000 952,381 3,452,381 293.5757
TOTAL 17,619,048 10,476,048 28,095,238
MOYAMBA DISTRICT – 2015
S/N CHIEFDOM JAN-JUNE JUL-DEC TOTAL AMOUNT CHEQUE NO.
1 P.C. Kayamba Chiefdom 9,523,810 9,523,810 2935750
2 Chief Administrator Moyamba District Council 952,381 952,381
TOTAL 10,476,190 10,476,190

 


            APPENDIX 6

            DETAILS OF RECONCILIATION SLEITI 2015

               KOIDU LIMITED (TONGUMA)

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence             480,143           480,143             456,957            456,957             480,143            456,957           23,186          23,186
2 Exploration Licence                     –                      –                       –                      –                   –                  –
3 Royalty          4,941,156        4,941,156 4,951,942         4,951,942          4,941,156         4,951,942         (10,786)        (10,786)
4 Export duty for Diamonds                     –                      –                       –                      –                   –                  –
5 Corporate Tax                     –                      –                       –                      –                   –                  –
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee                     –                      –                       –                      –                   –                  –
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 111,175           111,175 141,550            141,550             111,175            141,550         (30,375)        (30,375)
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 22,235             22,235 28,310              28,310               22,235              28,310           (6,075)          (6,075)
9 Surface Rent 65,859 -42,805             23,054               23,054              23,054               23,054              23,054                   –                  –
10 Agricultural Development Fund                     –                      –                       –                      –                   –                  –
11 Community Development Fund                     –                      –                       –                      –                   –                  –
  TOTAL     5,620,568.00    (42,805.00)   5,577,763.00     5,601,813.15                –      5,601,813.15     5,577,763.00    5,601,813.15    (24,050.15)   (24,050.15)

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 0             132,331         132,331 0          132,331       (132,331)      (132,331)
2 Exploration Licence 0                  –               –                    –                   –                 –
3 Royalty 0 3,231,219      3,231,219               –       3,231,219    (3,231,219)   (3,231,219)
4 Export duty for Diamonds 0                  –               –                    –                   –                 –
5 Corporate Tax 0             979,649         979,649               –          979,649       (979,649)      (979,649)
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 0                  –               –                    –                   –                 –
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 0 220,670         220,670               –          220,670       (220,670)      (220,670)
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 0 44,134           44,134               –            44,134         (44,134)        (44,134)
9 Surface Rent 0                  –               –                    –                   –                 –
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0                  –               –                    –                   –                 –
11 Community Development Fund 0                  –               –                    –                   –                 –
  TOTAL 0 0 0 4608003.08 0 4608003.08 0 4608003.08 -4608003.08 -4608003.1

  SIERRA RUTILE LIMITED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

             TIMIS MINING CORPORATION SL LIMITED

Company Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 0                500,000       500,000 0          500,000      (500,000)      (500,000)
2 Exploration Licence 0                 – 0                    –                  –                 –
3 Royalty 0 1,442,499    1,442,499 0       1,442,499   (1,442,499)   (1,442,499)
4 Export duty for Diamonds 0                 – 0                    –                  –                 –
5 Corporate Tax 0                 – 0                    –                  –                 –
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 0                 – 0                    –                  –                 –
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 0 291,110       291,110 0          291,110      (291,110)      (291,110)
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 0 58,162         58,162 0            58,162        (58,162)        (58,162)
9 Surface Rent 0                 – 0                    –                  –                 –
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0                 – 0                    –                  –                 –
11 Community Development Fund 0                 – 0                    –                  –                 –
  TOTAL 0 0 0 2291771 0 2291771 0 2291771 -2291771 -2291771

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  VIMETCO SMHL

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 550,000 550,000               550,000          550,000 550,000           550,000               –               –
2 Exploration Licence                    43,207 43,207                 43,207            43,207               –               –
3 Royalty               1,263,310 1,263,310 1,263,309       1,263,309               –               –
4 Export duty for Diamonds 0                   –               –               –
5 Corporate Tax 0 0                   –               –               –
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 0                   –               –               –
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License                  160,116 160,116 152,520          152,520               –               –
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees                    30,504 30,504 35,952            35,952               –               –
9 Surface Rent                  134,291   (87,289.00) 47,002                 47,002            47,002               –               –
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0                   –               –               –
11 Community Development Fund                  217,695 217,695                   –               –               –
  TOTAL 2,399,123 -87,289 2,311,834 2,091,990 0 2,091,990 550,000 550,000 0 0

 

 

 

 

 

     H.M.DIAMONDS

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 0                 – 0                    –               –              –
2 Exploration Licence 0                 – 0                    –               –              –
3 Royalty 0                 – 0                    –               –              –
4 Export duty for Diamonds         1,578,718.00 1578718           1,578,721    1,578,721 1578718       1,578,721               (3)              (3)
5 Corporate Tax            157,870.00 157870              181,772       181,772 157870          181,772      (23,902)     (23,902)
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee              36,500.00 36500                35,000         35,000 36500            35,000          1,500         1,500
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 0                 – 0                    –               –              –
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 0                 – 0                    –               –              –
9 Surface Rent 0                 – 0                    –               –              –
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0                 – 0                    –               –              –
11 Community Development Fund 0                 – 0                    –               –              –
  TOTAL 1773088 0 1773088 1795493 0 1795493 1773088 1795493 -22405 -22405

 

 

 

 

 

 

    S.D. STEEL – TINKOLILI IRON ORE SIERRA LEONE LTD/AFRICAN MINERALS

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence            1,000,000   1,000,000            1,250,000       1,250,000      1,000,000        1,250,000      (250,000)     (250,000)
2 Exploration Licence                –                   –                   –                    –                  –                 –
3 Royalty                –                   –                   –                    –                  –                 –
4 Export duty for Diamonds                –                   –                   –                    –                  –                 –
5 Corporate Tax                –                   –                   –                    –                  –                 –
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee                –                   –                   –                    –                  –                 –
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License               207,720      207,720 445,840          445,840         207,720           445,840      (238,120)     (238,120)
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees                 41,544        41,544 89,168            89,168           41,544             89,168        (47,624)       (47,624)
9 Surface Rent                 23,415       (15,220)          8,195                   –             8,195                    –            8,195           8,195
10 Agricultural Development Fund                –                   –                   –                    –                  –                 –
11 Community Development Fund                –                   –                   –                    –                  –                 –
  TOTAL            1,272,679       (15,220)   1,257,459            1,785,008                –         1,785,008      1,257,459        1,785,008      (527,549)     (527,549)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  KASSIM M. BASMA

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 0                – 0                   –               –               –
2 Exploration Licence 0                – 0                   –               –               –
3 Royalty 0                – 0                   –               –               –
4 Export duty for Diamonds           419,832.00     419,832               419,832      419,832 419832         419,832               –               –
5 Corporate Tax             41,984.00       41,984                 41,983        41,983 41984           41,983                1                 1
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 35,000       35,000                 35,000        35,000 35000           35,000               –               –
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License               –                – 0                   –               –               –
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees               –                – 0                   –               –               –
9 Surface Rent               –                – 0                   –               –               –
10 Agricultural Development Fund               –                – 0                   –               –               –
11 Community Development Fund               –                – 0                   –               –               –
TOTAL 496816 0     496,816               496,815 0 496815.22 496816 496815.22 0.78 0.78

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    CLUFF-AMARA MINING SL. LTD IRO BAOMAHUN GOLD LIMITED

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over Under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 0                – 0                  –                  –                   –
2 Exploration Licence 0             281,240      281,240 0         281,240       (281,240)       (281,240)
3 Royalty 0                – 0                  –                  –                   –
4 Export duty for Diamonds 0                – 0                  –                  –                   –
5 Corporate Tax 0                – 0                  –                  –                   –
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 0                – 0                  –                  –                   –
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 0 125,450      125,450 0         125,450       (125,450)       (125,450)
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 0 25,090        25,090 0           25,090         (25,090)         (25,090)
9 Surface Rent 0                – 0                  –                  –                   –
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0                – 0                  –                  –                   –
11 Community Development Fund 0                – 0                  –                  –                   –
  TOTAL 0 0 0 431780 0 431780 0         431,780       (431,780)  (431,780.00)

 

 

 

 

 

 

             AMR GOLD SL LTD. IRO WICKINSON HILL MINING

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
2 Exploration Licence 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
3 Royalty 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
4 Export duty for Diamonds 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
5 Corporate Tax 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
9 Surface Rent 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
11 Community Development Fund 0                – 0                      –                  –                 –
  TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SHAWKE B. SHOUR

    Company   Government Final Amounts Unresolved
No. Revenue Stream Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Initial Amount US$ Resolved Final Company Government Over Under
  2015
1 Mining Licence 0                – 0                    –                –                –
2 Exploration Licence 0                – 0                    –                –                –
3 Royalty 0                – 0                    –                –                –
4 Export duty for Diamonds 0               170,291      170,291 0          170,291    (170,291)     (170,291)
5 Corporate Tax 0                 17,029        17,029 0            17,029      (17,029)       (17,029)
6 Diamond Exporter’s License fee 0 35,000        35,000 0            35,000      (35,000)       (35,000)
7 Environmental Impact Assessment License 0                – 0                    –                –                –
8 Environmental Impact Assessment Monitoring Fees 0                – 0                    –                –                –
9 Surface Rent 0                – 0                    –                –                –
10 Agricultural Development Fund 0                – 0                    –                –                –
11 Community Development Fund 0                – 0                    –                –                –
  TOTAL 0 0 0 222320.11 0 222320.11 0 222320.11 -222320.11 -222320.11

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Sierra Leone Audit Manual ;EITI Standard ;Extractive Industries Revenue Draft Bill; Income Tax Act 2000, as amended; Environmental Protection Agency Act 2008;Final Value Chain Analysis Report; SLEITI 2006-2007 Report; SLEITI 2008-2010 Report; SLEITI 2011 Report;2011 scoping studies report; Commentary on previous EITI Reports; Civil society reports; Validation Reports; SLEITI 2010 Validation Report; SLEITI 2012 Validation Report

 

 

[2] https://www.kimberleyprocess.com/en/system/files/documents/2014_kpcs_annual_report_sierra_leone_0.pdf

[3] Production values were established by employing export value per unit sold.

[4] http://www.statehouse.gov.sl/index.php/contact/1658-loan-repayment-is-timely-president-tells-sierra-rutile

[5] Exchange rate of 5000 and 6205 leones to 1 US dollar were applied  for 2015 and 2016 respectively

[6] The IA could not obtain any confirmation of payment by AMR(GOLD)LTD from any government Agency. The figure stated in the unilateral declaration was  from taken from the data obtained for scoping study.

[7] The Informal Economy in Sub-Saharan Africa: Size and determinants – July 2017

[8] Source: http://awoko.org/2017/02/23/sierra-leone-business-2016-nra-collection-increased-by-25-2/

[9] IMF Projections

[10] IMF Projections

[11] Excluding Grants & Other Supports

[12] Based on the Dataset from NRA.

[13] Statistics Sierra Leone

[14] IMF Proections